PC


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politically correct

Describing statements or behavior careful to avoid offense or insensitivity. Our CEO is constantly being criticized in the media because he rarely makes politically correct speeches.
See also: correct

PC

An abbreviation for "politically correct," used to describe statements or behavior that are careful to avoid being offensive or insensitive. Our CEO is constantly being criticized in the media because his speeches are rarely PC.

PC

Also, p.c. An abbreviation for politically correct.

politically correct

Also, PC or p.c. Showing an effort to make broad social and political changes to redress injustices caused by prejudice. It often involves changing or avoiding language that might offend anyone, especially with respect to gender, race, or ethnic background. For example, Editors of major papers have sent out numerous directives concerning politically correct language . This expression was born in the late 1900s, and excesses in trying to conform to its philosophy gave rise to humorous parodies.
See also: correct

poˌlitically corˈrect

(abbr. PC) used to describe language or behaviour that deliberately tries to avoid offending particular groups of people: These days everybody has to be politically correct. I even heard someone the other day calling a short person ‘vertically challenged’!
See also: correct

politically correct

Avoidance of speaking or behaving in a way that would offend anyone’s sensibilities concerning race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic levels, or politics. Surprisingly, this cliché of the latter twentieth century, well known enough to be sometimes abbreviated as P.C., was used in 1793 by J. Wilson in the U.S. House of Representatives: “‘The United States,’ instead of the ‘People of the United States,’ is the toast given. This is not politically correct” (cited by the OED). Presumably Mr. Wilson here was referring to precision in political language. The current meaning of the phrase did not surface until the mid-1900s and was a cliché by the 1990s. The negative, politically incorrect, is also sometimes used. A letter to the editor of the Chicago Daily Herald, writing about the proposed building of a Muslim mosque near ground zero in New York City, said, “Is it not ‘politically incorrect’ for a Muslim mosque to be built in this area?” (Georgene Beazley, August 21, 2010). And a character discussing a possible suspect, “Just keep an eye on him. These guys usually screw up. Most of them don’t think what they’re doing is wrong, just politically incorrect” (Nevada Barr, Burn, 2010).
See also: correct