out of harm's way


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out of harm's way

Not or no longer in a place, condition, or situation that might result in one's harm or peril. We need to get all these bystanders out of harm's way before we try and put the fire out. You're so anxious to keep your children out of harm's way that you're going to end up denying them a lot of valuable life experiences.
See also: of, out, way
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*out of harm's way

Fig. not liable to be harmed; away from any causes of harm. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; get someone ~.) We should try to get all the civilians out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

out of harm's way

In a safe condition or place, as in We fenced the yard to keep the children out of harm's way. This idiom was first recorded about 1661.
See also: of, out, way
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

out of harm's way

COMMON If someone or something is out of harm's way, they are in a safe place away from danger or from the possibility of being damaged. For parents, this is an easy way of keeping their children entertained, or simply out of harm's way. Workers scrambled to carry priceless objects out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

out of harm's way

in a safe place.
1996 Frank McCourt Angela's Ashes Take down the Pope and hide him in the coal hole…where he won't be seen and he'll be out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

out of harm’s ˈway

in a place where somebody/something cannot cause or suffer injury, accident, loss, etc: Most people think that dangerous criminals should be locked up out of harm’s way.You should put these glasses out of harm’s way. They’re too valuable to use every day.
See also: of, out, way
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

out of harm's way

In a safe place, away from possible accident or injury. This term dates from the mid-1600s. Richard Steele had it in The Spectator (1711) in what might well be hyperbolic form: “People send Children to school to keep them out of harm’s way.” Oddly enough the corollary, “in harm’s way,” never caught on.
See also: of, out, way
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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