OP

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go co-op

Typically said of an apartment building that has become a cooperative (or "co-op")—a building in which residents do not own property but rather own shares in the corporation that owns the building. I can't believe that our building is going co-op—I might need to move.
See also: go

OP

1. slang An initialism for "other people," referring to a cigarette given to one by someone whom one asked for it. He stumbled out of the bar going around to the people outside looking for OPs.
2. slang By extension, a person who asks someone for a cigarette. Cynthia doesn't smoke for the most part, but whenever we go out drinking she turns into such an OP!
3. slang An initialism of "overpowered," referring to a character, weapon, move, or other aspect of the game that is unfairly strong in comparison to the rest of the game. Beating the side quest nets you a mystical sword that is so OP that you basically can't be beaten from that point on. The new character they added to the fighting game has a very cool design, but she is totally OP. Unless the developers nerf her moves, I doubt she'll be allowed in competitive play.

photo op

A shortening of "photo(graph) opportunity," literally, an ideal chance to take photographs, especially of someone famous. The actors all got together for a photo op with fans at the convention. The CEO agreed to a rare photo op for the press.
See also: OP

photo op(portunity)

a time or event designed for taking pictures of a celebrity. All the photographers raced toward a photo op with the president.
See also: OP

OP’s

(ˈoˈpiz)
n. other people’s cigarettes; begged or borrowed cigarettes. (Initialism.) My favorite kind of cigarettes is OP’s. They’re the cheapest, too.

photo op

A chance for a photograph, often for publicity purposes. The “op” here is short for “opportunity.” Deborah Eisenberg used it in her story, “Under the 82nd Airborne”: “‘Relax,’ Lewis said. ‘There’s no one here for them to fight with—this is a photo op.’” See also sound bite.
See also: OP
References in periodicals archive ?
Part of the problem is that Congress simply has never given OPS the resources to do its job properly.
With so few resources, OPS has relied on the industry to perform its own inspections and develop its own safety plans.
Back in 1990, OPS assessed fines in almost half its enforcement actions.
OPS official Byron Coy testified to NTSB that "fundamental systems that were installed in the '60s typically had useful lives of nearly 20 years, but the pace of technological advancement has caused some systems that were installed even in the '90s to be considered mature.
To fill the vacuum left by OPS, GAO recommended last year that OPS get states more involved in regulating pipelines to better leverage federal resources, but so far, OPS hasn't done much on that front.
In the transportation appropriations bill awaiting Bush's signature, OPS got funding for 26 more professionals it wanted, including inspectors and legal staff.