OJ

(redirected from OJED)
Also found in: Acronyms.

OJ

1. An initialism of "orange juice." I never eat very much for breakfast, usually just a slice of toast and a glass of OJ.
2. offensive slang To stab someone. A reference to O.J. Simpson, who was tried but acquitted of murder by stabbing. That dude had gang symbols tattooed on his arms. You're lucky he didn't OJ you!

overjolt

1. slang An extreme, life-threatening physical reaction to some narcotic, especially heroin, opioids, cocaine, or amphetamines, often due to using an excessive amount; an overdose. My friend died from an overjolt of laced cocaine. I don't touch the stuff ever since. I just stick to smoking weed—no risk of an overjolt on that stuff.
2. slang To experience such a reaction. My brother actually overjolted on morphine after getting addicted to it following his surgery. I thought you were overjolting from the way you were sweating and your eyes were rolled back in your head.

OJ

1. n. orange juice. (Initialism.) I like to have a big glass of fresh OJ every morning.
2. Go to overjolt.

OJ someone

tv. to stab someone. (Refers to the O. J. Simpson stabbing case.) Don’t worry. I would never OJ my buddy.
See also: OJ, someone

overjolt

and OJ
1. n. an overdose of drugs, especially of heroin. (The abbreviation is an initialism. Drugs.) Ted is suffering from a serious OJ.
2. in. to take an overdose of drugs, especially of heroin. (Drugs.) She overjolted once too often.

OJ

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to avoid confusion due to variation in orthography in quotes from various printed and hand-written sources in three languages (Sundanese, Old Sundanese, and Old Javanese), all quotes from older literary sources have been standardized according to the system used in Zoetmulder's Old Javanese English dictionary (OJED) (1982), with slight changes as follows: the e-pepet is rendered as e, not e, while n becomes n.
Old Javanese)' (see also Zoetmulder's Old Javanese-English dictionary (hereafter OJED), pp.
(53) Totton (2003:23, note 35), probably after OJED 925 which gives Egretta ardea, identifies the kuntul as a Great White Egret (Egretta alba).
While this meaning is not found in OJED, there is evidence of its usage in this sense in RK 2.9c, and, as pointed out to me by Arlo Griffiths, in verse 59 of the Sanskrit-Old Javanese lexicon Amaramala (part of the Candakirana or Candakarana, see Lokesh Chandra 1997:202), which glosses it with a variety of Old Javanese synonyms of 'hunter'.
(59) This translation, proposed by OJED, is uncertain.
(60) The term kala also means 'scorpion' (OJED 767); however, it seems to me more appropriate to the present context to take it as an adjective referring to the crabs.