O ye of little faith

O ye of little faith

A mild and humorously formal rebuke of someone who has expressed doubt or incredulity about something one said one would or could do. The phrase is used in several places in the New Testament of the Bible. The uncommon and somewhat archaic interjection "O" is often simply rendered to "oh" in modern English. A: "Oh, wow. It looks like your shortcut really did save us a bunch of time." B: "O ye of little faith." A: "Are you sure this will work?" B: "Come on, I know what I'm doing, oh ye of little faith."
See also: faith, little, of, ye

Oh, ye of little faith.

Fig. You who trust no one. (Jocular; the word ye is an old form of you used in the Bible.) You thought I wouldn't show up on time? Oh, ye of little faith.
See also: faith, little, of, ye
References in periodicals archive ?
O ye of little faith. I am certain it will happen." Supporters watching the game at the church hall tomorrow will be joined by Mr Flavell and his family, wife Martha and daughters Elinor, six, and Georgia, four.
Hence Jesus has to put him in his place regularly: "Get behind me, Satan!" "O ye of little faith!" Who's going to glue the ears back on when Peter comes out swinging?
O ye of little faith. As his winter repertory season reminded me, if you aren't seeing the Mark Morris company, you aren't seeing Mark Morris.
O ye of little faith: we need look no further than the controversial Supreme Court case of Webster v.