neanderthal

(redirected from Neanderthals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Neanderthals: Human evolution

neanderthal

(niˈændɚθɑl)
n. a large and ugly male. (see also caveman, cromagnon.) Tell that neanderthal to get out of here.
References in periodicals archive ?
We argue that the social significance of the broader pattern of healthcare has been overlooked and interpretations of a limited or calculated response to healthcare have been influenced by preconceptions of Neanderthals as being 'different' and even brutish," Spikins added.
The latest discoveries published in the journal Science show that Neanderthals were capable of sophisticated symbolic thought.
The significance of the new dating for Europe's oldest cave art is not that it makes Neanderthals the inventors of art.
Plenty of evidence already exists to debunk the myth that Neanderthals were knuckle-dragging brutes, and instead were capable of decorative impulses and rituals, like burying their dead.
Neanderthals are especially apt as subjects of a novel that explores human consciousness free of illusory abstractions.
The lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Barcelona, JoAaAaAeAeAaAaAeA o ZilhAaAaAeAeAaAaAeA o, said in the press release, "technol the Middle Paleolithic in Europe is exclusively associated with the Neanderthals.
Modern humans cling to the idea that Neanderthals were a lesser species, and that's why Homo sapiens prevailed.
The head of the archeological team in Mazandaran, Hamed Vahdati-Nasab, told the Mehr news agency, "The cultural material providing evidence of a Neanderthal settlement was discovered when an archeology student from Marlik College of Noshahr was strolling in the mountains in the vicinity of Bandpey.
It gives a unique insight into the culture and traditions of Neanderthals thousands of years ago and demonstrates the exciting range of the UKs cultural heritage.
The Neanderthals used boulders to shape stone tools and also used bone in some cases to sharpen the cutting edges (one example closer to home can be found in the bone retouchers, mainly belonging to deer, recovered on the Azlor site in Dima, Bizkaia).
Harris and Nielsen's simulations also suggest that humans and Neanderthals mixed much more freely than originally thought.
The development comes after US researchers became the first to directly compare the DNA of people today with Neanderthals.
Shipman presents readers with an investigation of the extinction of Neanderthals as a species, arguing that the early domestication of wolf-dogs by modern human migrants to Europe provided the species with a distinct advantage in hunting large Ice Age mammals in a time when climate change made Neanderthals especially vulnerable.
Additionally, the book provides strong evidence of gene flow between modern humans and both Neanderthals and Denisovans.
Writing for general readers interested in science, Paabo recounts his 30-year effort to sequence the genome of Neanderthal Man and explains what he discovered about the hotly debated relationship between Neanderthals and the early humans who lived in the same regions for thousands of years.