mutual

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mutual admiration society

A disparaging term for two (or more) people who engage in lavish mutual praise and admiration. I can't stand working with Tony and Linda. They praise each other from the moment they walk through the door—it's like they've formed a mutual admiration society!
See also: mutual, society

mutual admiration society

A relationship in which two people have strong feelings of esteem for each other and often exchange lavish compliments. The term may signify either genuine or pretended admiration, as in Each of them praised the other's book-it was a real mutual admiration society. The expression was invented by Henry David Thoreau in his journal (1851) and repeated by Oliver Wendell Holmes and others.
See also: mutual, society

mutual admiration society

A shared feeling of esteem, real or pretended, between two individuals for each other. This reciprocal relationship was first so called by Thoreau in 1851 and picked up by Oliver Wendell Holmes in The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table (1858). Today we often use the term sarcastically for individuals who publicly pay lavish compliments to each other but may have little respect for each other in private, or who admire each other but are not highly regarded by others.
See also: mutual, society

the feeling is mutual

You and I feel the same way. Strictly speaking, mutual means “reciprocal.” When Jack says, “I can’t stand your affected accent,” and Jill replies, “The feeling is mutual,” Jill is saying that she feels the same way about Jack’s accent. Nevertheless, in the course of the twentieth century, when this expression became a cliché, it was—and still is—often misused, in that it is used to describe a common or shared feeling about something or someone else. For example, when Jill says, “I think the president is marvelous” and Jack says, “The feeling is mutual,” he really means he thinks the same as she, but no reciprocity is involved. (This misuse has an honorable ancestry; Dickens made the same mistake in the title of his novel Our Mutual Friend.) See also mutual admiration society.
See also: feeling, mutual

mutual admiration society

Two or more people who lavishly praise the other person's or people's personalities and accomplishments, often far beyond what is deserved. The phrase, which is said to have originated with Henry David Thoreau in 1851, may have been used earlier. Its use as the title of a song from the 1956 musical comedy Happy Hunting that was successfully recorded by a number of singers boosted the phrase's popularity.
See also: mutual, society
References in periodicals archive ?
The observation on small mutuals came in the ratings agency's annual look at how the overall mutual insurance business is doing.
Raising capital is also a challenge because insureds are both customers and owners of mutuals. "If there is a capital call, these customer/owners might be obligated to contribute additional capital, since mutual companies cannot raise capital by issuing stock like shareholder-owned insurance companies," Lee said.
There has also been a renewed focus on capital solutions available to mutuals, including legislation in some countries to allow equity-like capital instruments to be issued, such as "certificats mutualistes" in France.
The Boston Consulting Group report, Soft Finance, Hard Choices, analysed the performance of 71 mutuals, which currently deliver Au1.2 billion of public services, as well as 15 mutual projects in development.
MetLife is one of a number of major insurance companies that have or will be demutualizing -- converting from mutual to public ownership.
Mutual insurance companies have been writing life and property/casualty insurance in Indiana for well over a century now.
The Government has selected people from a wide variety of organisations, including local authorities, mutuals, professional services and business firms, to deliver effective support.
Equitable Life situation challenge mutuals to achieve their theoretically possible, but often historically unattained, excellence.
Creating a new mutual is "not significantly different than creating any type of new insurance company," said Chamness." Mutuals have capitalization and admittance requirements as do stock companies." The difference, he said, lies in a mutual's foundation--a group of individuals or businesses that share a common risk or need and band together--something not unlike Benjamin Franklin's foundation of the first successful mutual more than 250 years ago.
As a result, many insurers have sold the bulk of their equity real estate portfolios shortly before or soon after demutualizing--that is, converting from a mutual insurer into a publicly traded company, McAneny said.
As top executives and directors of several mutuals develop their long-term strategic plans, they quietly are realizing that they might be better positioned for the future if they go forward as part of a larger entity, rather than continuing solo.
Forging stronger communication and relationships with policyholders is only part of an effective communications strategy Mutuals also must maintain and strengthen their regulatory relationships to ensure that those agencies are working with them and will back them in the tough times.
Of the three mutuals that intend to tap into that kind of bonanza this year, Newark, N.J.-based Prudential seems to be the farthest along, but it may still have the farthest to go.
Mutuals will lose because they will lack the results-oriented "stock culture," they won't have a stock currency for timely acquisitions, and they will suffer from a "talent drift" as they fail to attract and compensate top-performing employees.
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