musical

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a game of musical chairs

A situation in which people or things are moved, shuffled, or rearranged from one position to another. After the boss resigned, it was a regular game of musical chairs in the company to figure out who would take over for whom. It's been a game of musical chairs trying to create enough space in the living room for Alex's birthday party this weekend.
See also: chair, game, musical, of

play musical chairs

1. Literally, to play the children's game known as "musical chairs," in which participants walk around a circle of chairs until the music stops and each person tries to sit on a chair. There are always fewer chairs than players, and the person who remains standing is removed from the game after each round, until only one remains. Mommy, can we play musical chairs at my birthday party?
2. To move, shuffle, or rearrange people from one position to another, as in a group or organization. After the boss resigned, everyone started playing musical chairs in the company to figure out who would take over for whom. We've been playing musical chairs trying to create enough space in the living room for Alex's birthday party this weekend.
See also: chair, musical, play

accompany someone on a musical instrument

to provide complementary instrumental music for someone's musical performance. Sally accompanied the singer on the piano.
See also: accompany, musical, on

musical chairs, play

Move around from position to position, such as the jobs in an organization. For example, Bob took over for Tom, who took over for Mary, who got Bob's title-the boss loves to play musical chairs with the staff . This expression alludes to the children's game in which children walk around a number of seats while music plays, and there is one less chair than players. When the music stops the players must sit down, and the player who is left standing is eliminated. Then another chair is removed, and the game goes on until only one player is left sitting. [c. 1900]
See also: musical, play

musical beds

n. acts of sexual promiscuity; sleeping with many people. (From the name of the game musical chairs.) Mary has been playing musical beds for about a year.
See also: bed, musical
References in classic literature ?
But the longer Bell toiled at his musical telegraph, the more he dreamed of replacing the telegraph and its cumbrous sign-language by a new machine that would carry, not dots and dashes, but the human voice.
Sanders and Hubbard, who had been paying the cost of his experiments, abruptly announced that they would pay no more unless he confined his attention to the musical telegraph, and stopped wasting his time on ear-toys that never could be of any financial value.
Consequently, when Bell returned from Washington, he was compelled by his agreement to devote himself mainly to the musical telegraph, although his heart was now with the telephone.
He forgot his musical telegraph, his "Visible Speech," his classes, his poverty.
There was the first electric light, and the first grain-binder, and the musical telegraph of Elisha Gray, and the marvellous exhibit of printing telegraphs shown by the Western Union Company.
Punctual to the time at which he was expected, the discreet Duncan reappeared with a note from the musical agent.
She soon found that whistling to the bullfinches in Mrs d'Urberville's room was no such onerous business when she had regained the art, for she had caught from her musical mother numerous airs that suited those songsters admirably.
and not "he loves me," since an unalterable and unquestioned law of the musical world required that the German text of French operas sung by Swedish artists should be translated into Italian for the clearer understanding of English- speaking audiences.
This supplementary program also instructed the excursionists to provide themselves with light musical instruments for amusement in the ship, with saddles for Syrian travel, green spectacles and umbrellas, veils for Egypt, and substantial clothing to use in rough pilgrimizing in the Holy Land.
Her phrases, so bald and few, constantly repeated, showed the emptiness of her mind; he recalled her vulgar little laugh at the jokes of the musical comedy; and he remembered the little finger carefully extended when she held her glass to her mouth; her manners like her conversation, were odiously genteel.
Wollman presents a meticulously researched examination of the way the sexual revolution, the 1970s financial crisis in New York City, second-wave feminism, and post-Stonewall LGBTQ activism were reflected in the Off-, Off-Off-, and Broadway musicals of the seventies.
What I like about this way of tackling our Broadway musicals is that it makes something distinctly new of something distinctly old.
Rockwell and Bogart's ``The Musical of Musicals: The Musical'' may be a bit too inside baseball to anyone who doesn't know ``Mame,'' ``Oklahoma
Something similar has happened in theater, where musicals about musicals (most recent example: Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me at Broadway's Bernard Jacobs Theatre) have taken over the field.
Over a dozen musical films from the last decade are analyzed to explain how artists have interpreted and imbibed such musicals with new life, using psychology, sexuality, and more to revive the art form.