mung up

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mung up

1. To ruin or damage something; to mess up something. In this usage, a noun of pronoun can be used between "mung" and "up." The threat of a hurricane really munged up our vacation plans! Boy, you really munged this engine up. When was the last time you got your oil changed? I munged up my knee in practice last night so I won't be able to play on Saturday.
2. To make a mistake; to mess up. I think I munged up by putting it in the oven too soon. You munged up, Dave. Just admit and we can all move on.
3. To fail or malfunction. The printer munged up last night so I still haven't printed my report. It looks like the carburetor is totally munged up—you'll have to get the whole thing replaced.
See also: mung, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

mung something up

Sl. to mess something up. Don't mung it up this time. The team munged up the play, and the coach blasted them but good.
See also: mung, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mung something up

tv. to mess something up. The team munged up the play, and the coach blasted them but good.
See also: mung, something, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Several auxins were found to cause necrosis and death of hypocotyls of treated mung bean seedlings at a concentration of 10-3 M (Kollarovaet al.
In our study, mung bean seedlings could tolerate up to 6% lactic acid depending on the variety, indicating that levels phytotoxic to common weeds may not be phytotoxic to certain mung bean varieties.
The effects of lactic acid on the growth of mung beans in vitro may vary physiologically and morphologically from those growing in soil with different microbial and nutritional conditions.
In fact, soil-incorporated lactic acid as an organic herbicide may be ideal and more efficient for mung bean because as a slow-growing field crop that loses out to faster growing weeds, it could have a starting advantage over lactic-acid-sensitive weeds.
Effects of varying concentration levels of lactic acid on the root and shoot length, shoot-to-root ratio, fresh and dry weight of the two varieties of mung beans
Conclusion: In this study, it was found that mung bean seedlings, in general, can tolerate up to 2% (v/v) lactic acid as this did not affect shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots.
Phytotoxicity of selected herbicides to mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.).
Effect of auxins and plant oligosaccharides on root formation and elongation growth of mung bean hypocotyls.