Mrs


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Miss Right

The perfect or most suitable woman to be in a relationship with or to marry. If you're waiting for Miss Right to just appear in your life, you're never going to find someone you'll be happy with. You have to get out there and give people a chance! After my last relationship ended, I decided to stop looking for Ms. Right and focus on other priorities in my life.
See also: miss, right

Mrs. Grundy

One who strongly values traditional propriety. In the Thomas Morton play Speed the Plough, Mrs. Grundy is a character known for her zeal for proper conduct. You can't wear jeans to this dinner party! Your grandmother will be there, and she is basically Mrs. Grundy!

Mrs. Astor's pet horse

old-fashioned Someone dressed or decorated very ostentatiously; someone who is particularly pretentious or showy in appearance. The "Mrs. Astor" in the phrase refers to American financier William Astor's wife Caroline, a legendary 19th-century New York City socialite known for her lavish parties. Look at her swanning about in all her furs and jewelry, like Mrs. Astor's pet horse.
See also: horse, pet

Mrs. Astor's plush horse

old-fashioned Someone dressed or decorated very ostentatiously; someone who is particularly pretentious or showy in appearance. The "Mrs. Astor" in the phrase refers to American financier William Astor's wife Caroline, a legendary 19th-century New York City socialite known for her lavish parties. Look at her swanning about in all her furs and jewelry, like Mrs. Astor's plush horse.
See also: horse

Mr./Ms./Mrs. Moneybags

A humorous nickname for an excessively or extravagantly wealthy person. Look at Mr. Moneybags over here, booking a first-class plane ticket. Can't fly coach like the rest of us bums, eh Jerry? Hey, Ms. Moneybags—not all of us can afford to eat at such an expensive restaurant!
See also: Moneybag

go see Mrs. Murphy

euphemism, old-fashioned To go to the bathroom to use the toilet. Excuse me, I need to go see Mrs. Murphy for a moment. A: "Where's John?" B: "He just went to see Mrs. Murphy, should be back soon."
See also: go, Murphy, see

going to see Mrs. Murphy

euphemism, old-fashioned Going to the bathroom to use the toilet. Excuse me, I'm just going to see Mrs. Murphy for a moment. A: "Where's John?" B: "He's going to see Mrs. Murphy, should be back soon."
See also: going, Murphy, see

visit Mrs. Murphy

euphemism, old-fashioned To go to the bathroom to use the toilet. Excuse me, I need to visit Mrs. Murphy for a moment. A: "Where's John?" B: "He just had to visit Mrs. Murphy, should be back soon."
See also: Murphy, visit

visiting Mrs. Murphy

euphemism, old-fashioned Going to the bathroom to use the toilet. Excuse me, I'm just visiting Mrs. Murphy for a moment. A: "Where's John?" B: "He's visiting Mrs. Murphy, should be back soon."
See also: Murphy, visit

Mrs. Murphy

n. a bathroom. Whose turn is it at Mrs. Murphy’s?
See also: Murphy

Mrs. Astor's plush horse

Ostentatious. Mrs. William Astor, the leader of New York society at the end of the 19th century, was not one to spare any expense in clothing, furnishings, or other accoutrements of the Good Life (so much for the idea of quiet old money). Her appearance and her gala parties were so sumptuous and well-known that anyone who appeared dolled up beyond normal was ridiculed as “Astor's plush [or pet] horse,” as if the formidable Mrs. A had lavished her wealth on that person as she would on a favorite plaything.
See also: horse
References in classic literature ?
'I think you ought to see him,' replied Mrs. Cluppins.
'I think two witnesses would be more lawful,' said Mrs. Sanders, who, like the other friend, was bursting with curiosity.
'Perhaps he'd better come in here,' said Mrs. Bardell.
And don't you begin to find it pleasant now,' said Mrs Boffin, once more radiant in her comely way from head to foot, and once more smoothing her dress with immense enjoyment,
'Yes; and it's pleasant to know that you are Mrs Boffin,' said her husband, 'and it's been a pleasant thing to know this many and many a year!' It was ruin to Mrs Boffin's aspirations, but, having so spoken, they sat side by side, a hopelessly Unfashionable pair.
'MY good opinion,' said Mrs Nickleby, and the poor lady exulted in the idea that she was marvellously sly,--'my good opinion can be of very little consequence to a gentleman like Sir Mulberry.'
'Pyke, of what consequence to our friend, Sir Mulberry, is the good opinion of Mrs Nickleby?'
LIZA [speaking with pedantic correctness of pronunciation and great beauty of tone] How do you do, Mrs. Higgins?
MRS. HIGGINS [cordially] Quite right: I'm very glad indeed to see you.
'But, young men,' resumed Mrs Merdle, 'and by young men you know what I mean, my love--I mean people's sons who have the world before them--they must place themselves in a better position towards Society by marriage, or Society really will not have any patience with their making fools of themselves.
'But it is true,' said Mrs Gowan, with a highly moral air.
Mrs. Clements did all in her power to oppose the execution of this hazardous and unaccountable project.
On the journey from London to Hampshire Mrs. Clements discovered that one of their fellow-passengers was well acquainted with the neighbourhood of Blackwater, and could give her all the information she needed on the subject of localities.
'What are the restless wretches doing now?' asked Mrs. Sparsit.
'It is much to be regretted,' said Mrs. Sparsit, making her nose more Roman and her eyebrows more Coriolanian in the strength of her severity, 'that the united masters allow of any such class- combinations.'