Motown


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Motown

1. A shortening of the nickname "Motor Town," given to Detroit, Michigan, a center of auto manufacturing in the US. We're heading down to Motown for the weekend—want to come?
2. A genre of music featuring elements of rhythm and blues, pop, soul, and gospel popularized by African-American musicians of the Detroit-based record company Motown Records. The name is a trademark. Is there a more universally loved genre than Motown? Put it on at any party and everyone loves it.

Motown

(ˈmotɑʊn)
n. motor town, Detroit, Michigan. We went to Motown to buy a car once.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Motown gives you a vocabulary of very, very specific moves.
Or visit www.horsecross.co.uk For your chance to win, simply answer this question: Complete the name of this Motown hit, Signed, Sealed, ...
? Magic of Motown, Theatr Hafren Newtown, October 21.
Professor Charles Sykes, who directs the African American Arts Institute at Indiana University, can attest to Motown's impact and multigenerational appeal.
It is one of the UK's best live Motown shows and returns to Coventry with a new show combining first-class music, choreography and a live band celebrating 50 years of Motown music.
"Anyway, William came in and asked me to go to Motown's legendary studio at 2648 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Hitsville USA.
And, should there be anyone out there left wondering why so many of us are still obsessed with the sounds of Motown, let's let Daryl Easlea answer.
During the 1960s, more than 68 Motown singles reached the million-seller mark, and Motown artists made an incredible amount of money performing in nightclubs and concerts.
Now, I don't know that he was, but as a Southern frat boy, he would have been ironically typical of the initial audiences for Stax Records, the Memphis-based label whose music, along with Motown's, helped transport cultural integration to a broader plain.
West Grand Media Entertainment is an asset-management company owned by Berry Gordy, founder of Motown Records.
In 1993, PolyGram and Polydor, along with group companies in the U.S., Germany and the Netherlands, purchased Motown for more than 10 billion yen through a U.S.
Alarming Motown has had one run so far, in a Newbury maiden in the autumn of 1997, when she was 10th of 24 to Mister Rambo and Fa-Eq.
While whites generally view Motown as a source of contemporary music, blacks say the record company's significance is much greater than that.
Besides, '60s record companies such as Philles, Motown, Red Bird, Scepter, and Wand all routinely made different versions of the same song with different artists from the same label.