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a month of Sundays

An extremely long, often indefinite period of time. Often used in negative constructions, especially to mean "never." A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!" We'll be here for a month of Sundays trying to sort through all this paperwork!
See also: month, of, Sundays

before last

Before the last such time period. This phrase is usually used with quantities of time, such as years, months, and weeks. I can't believe that Aunt Marie is in the hospital. I just talked to her the week before last, and she was totally fine! I got my degree the year before last.
See also: before, last

by the day

Per day; at a daily rate. You can't afford to miss work when you get paid by the day. I'm renting this hotel room by the day because I could get my next travel assignment at any time.
See also: by

by the month

Per month; at a monthly rate. I'm renting this apartment by the month because I could get my next travel assignment at any time.
See also: by, month

days running

Consecutive days. If you've been sick for 10 days running, you should probably go to the doctor.
See also: days, running

flavor of the month

Something temporary. The phrase is often used to describe fleeting romantic relationships. I wouldn't get too attached to Katie, she's just Ralph's flavor of the month—they'll break up in no time. You change majors all the time, and biology is just the flavor of the month, trust me!
See also: flavor, month, of

for (some) months running

For (some number of) consecutive months. We've been waiting to close on the house for three months running—when will this process finally be over?
See also: month, running

haven't seen you in a month of Sundays

A phrase used when one encounters someone after an extremely long, often indefinite period of time. Hey, Al, haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! How have you been?
See also: month, of, seen, Sundays

in a coon's age

In an exceptionally long period of time. Based on the folk belief that raccoons (shortened colloquially to "coons") have a longer-than-average lifespan. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. I haven't seen you in a coon's age! How have you been? I haven't been on a vacation in a coon's age.
See also: age

in a month of Sundays

1. At any point; under any circumstances. Used in the negative to convey that something will never happen. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
2. In an exceptionally long period of time. I haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! How have you been? I haven't been on a vacation in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

month after month

Repeatedly for consecutive months, usually for a long, indefinite period of time. I sometimes feel trapped by all the bills I have to pay, month after month.
See also: after, month

month by month

1. During the course of each consecutive month. We've steadily been growing the userbase month by month.
2. Considering a month in comparison to the one before and after it. I think you need to look at your expenses month by month to see where you can try to save some money.
See also: by, month

months on end

Several months in a row. We've been waiting to close on the house for months on end—when will this process finally be over?
See also: end, month, on

months running

Consecutive months. The phrase is typically preceded by a number. We've been waiting to close on the house for three months running—when will this process finally be over?
See also: month, running

never in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Never in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Never in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, never, of, Sundays

not in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

spend (some amount of time) in (some place)

To be in some building, town, country, etc., for some amount of time. I spent a lot of my childhood in the library, learning about as many things as I could. We're only spending a couple of days in Rome, so we have to be very pragmatic about what we can see. I spent about four years in Tokyo teaching English before eventually moving back to Canada.
See also: amount, of, spend

that/(one's) time of the month

The time, usually once a month, at which a woman begins to menstruate. I've had horrible cramps and have been really tired lately. It must be coming up on that time of the month again. A: "I made a joke about it being Sally's time of the month, and she punched me in the face!" B: "Good for her. You had it coming."
See also: month, of, that, time

by the day

one day at a time. I don't know when I'll have to leave town, so I rent this room by the day.
See also: by

by the month

one month at a time. Not many apartments are rented by the month. I needed a car for a short while, so I rented one by the month.
See also: by, month

days running

 and weeks running; months running; years running
days in a series; months in a series; etc. (Follows a number.) I had a bad cold for five days running. For two years running, I brought work home from the office every night.
See also: days, running

(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays.

Rur. I haven't seen you in a long time. Tom: Hi, Bill Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Bill: Hi, Tom. Long time no see. Bob: Well, Fred! Come right in! Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Fred: Good to see you, Uncle Bob.
See also: month, of, seen, Sundays

in a coon's age

 and in a month of Sundays
Rur. in a very long time. (The coon is a raccoon.) How are you? I haven't seen you in a coon's age. I haven't had a piece of apple pie this good in a coon's age.
See also: age

by the day

Also, by the hour or week or month or year . According to a specific time period, as in I'm renting this car by the day, or He's being paid by the hour. This usage generally describes some kind of rate. [1400s]
See also: by

month of Sundays, a

A long time, as in I haven't seen Barbara in a month of Sundays. This expression, which would literally mean thirty weeks, has been used hyperbolically since it was first recorded in 1832. One writer suggests it originally connoted a long dreary time, since games and other kinds of amusement used to be forbidden on Sunday.
See also: month, of

flavour of the month

mainly BRITISH
COMMON If someone or something is flavour of the month, they are very popular at the moment. Note: `Flavour' is spelled `flavor' in American English. One minute you're flavour of the month, top of the bestseller charts, and the next minute you're forgotten. Filmstars seem to be interested in whatever cause is the latest flavour of the month. Note: People sometimes mention other periods of time such as year, week, or moment instead of month. Monetarism was the flavour of the year. Suddenly, he was flavour of the moment on both sides of the Atlantic. Note: These expressions are often used to suggest that the popularity of someone or something is unlikely to last long. Note: American ice cream parlours used to select a particular flavour of the month in order to encourage people to try different flavours of ice cream.
See also: flavour, month, of

not in a month of Sundays

or

never in a month of Sundays

If you say that something will not or will never happen in a month of Sundays, you mean it is very unlikely to happen. Their scheme will never work — not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

flavour of the month

someone or something that enjoys a short period of great popularity; the current fashion.
This phrase originated in a marketing campaign in American ice-cream parlours in the 1940s, when a particular flavour of ice cream would be singled out each month for special promotion.
See also: flavour, month, of

a month of Sundays

a very long, seemingly endless period of time.
This expression may be a reference to the traditionally slow passage of Sundays as a result of religious restrictions on activity or entertainment. In a letter written in 1849 , G. E. Jewsbury talked of the absence of mail deliveries on Sundays, remarking: ‘If I don't get a better letter from you…you may pass “a month of Sundays” at breakfast without any letter from me’.
1998 Country Life All in all, the Ministry of Agriculture is gaining the no-nonsense, get-your-coats-off atmosphere that Jack Cunningham could not have managed in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

flavour of the ˈmonth

(especially British English) a person who is especially popular at the moment: If I were you, I’d keep quiet at the staff meeting. You’re not exactly flavour of the month with the boss at the moment.In the past, ice cream companies in the US would choose a particular flavour each month to advertise in their stores.
See also: flavour, month, of

the day, week, month, etc. before ˈlast

the day, week, etc. just before the most recent one; two days, weeks, etc. ago: I haven’t seen him since the summer before last.
See also: before, last

month after ˈmonth

over a period of several months: Prices continue to rise month after month.
See also: after, month

ˌmonth by ˈmonth

as the months pass; each month: Her pain increased month by month.
See also: by, month

(not for/in) a ˌmonth of ˈSundays

(spoken) used to emphasize that something will never happen: ‘Do you think she’ll be able to sell the house at that price?’ ‘Not in a month of Sundays. It’s far too much.’
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays

Informal
An indefinitely long period of time: It will take you a month of Sundays to chop all that wood.
See also: month, of, Sundays

flavor of the month

A briefly prominent or popular person, product, or trend. The term originated in the 1930s in the ice cream industry, where a particular flavor of ice cream was promoted each month. Since the late 1900s, it has been used ironically to comment on a short-lived success of some kind. For example, “Their new album is the flavor of the month, but I doubt that it’ll survive.”
See also: flavor, month, of

month of Sundays, a

A very long time. It is doubtful that this expression, which dates from the early nineteenth century, was ever meant literally—that is, a period of thirty Sundays (or weeks). It first appeared in print in Frederick Marryat’s Newton Forster (1832) and was surely a cliché by the time Ogden Nash played on it in “My Dear, How Did You Ever Think up This Delicious Salad?” (1935): “The salad course nowadays seems to be a month of sundaes.” The British version, a week of Sundays, is never heard in America.
See also: month, of
References in classic literature ?
"Love never made a law so cruel, a law that would rob true lovers of each other's society for a whole month in a year, stretching them on the rack of absence--" There my period broke down, so I began another less ambitiously planned.
In 1859, in the month of August, the young traveller, Roscher, from Hamburg, set out with a caravan of Arab merchants, reached Lake Nyassa, and was there assassinated while he slept.
He reached Kazeh, on his return, on the 25th of August, and, in company with Burton, again took up the route to Zanzibar, where they arrived in the month of March in the following year.
790-791) On the eighth of the month geld the boar and loud- bellowing bull, but hard-working mules on the twelfth.
But take care to avoid troubles which eat out the heart on the fourth of the beginning and ending of the month; it is a day very fraught with fate.
Besides this, before they had been married half a year, the count and his friend the priest managed to bring about a quarrel between Aglaya and her family, so that it was now several months since they had seen her.
"Between the ages of seven months and eight months those children were changed in the cradle"--he made one of this effect- collecting pauses, and added--"and the person who did it is in this house!"
[Burst of applause, checked by the officers.] From seven months onward until now, A has still been a usurper, and in my finger record he bears B's name.
And while I forgot that I had plunged into the books nineteen hours a day for three solid months, Charley Le Grant shifted my outfit into a big Columbia River salmon boat.
"Half the 15th of this month, half the 15th of next."
"No, I have for the end of the month these bills which have been assigned to us by the house of Pascal, and the house of Wild & Turner of Marseilles, amounting to nearly 55,000 francs; in all, 287,500 francs." It is impossible to describe what Morrel suffered during this enumeration.
They come back, accompanied by Count Fosco and his wife, who propose to settle somewhere in the neighbourhood of London, and who have engaged to stay at Blackwater Park for the summer months before deciding on a place of residence.
I saw the good old lady safe to her destination, and left her in the care of her relative, quietly happy at the prospect of seeing Laura again in a few months' time.
Calculating our rate of progress from the date of our departure, I found that we had just time, and no more, to reach London on the last day of the month.
Month after month for the six years in which the "Editor's Study" continued in the keeping of its first occupant, its lesson was more or less stormily delivered, to the exclusion, for the greater part, of other prophecy, but it has not been found well to keep the tempestuous manner along with the fulminant matter in this volume.