Montezuma's revenge

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Montezuma's revenge

slang Diarrhea, especially that which is contracted from food poisoning. Usually refers to tourists traveling in Mexico (Montezuma II was the emperor of Mexico in the beginning of the 1500s) who lack immunity to bacteria that can be transferred via food and local drinking water. The best way to avoid Montezuma's revenge is to drink bottled water.
See also: revenge

Montezuma’s revenge

(mɑntəˈzuməz rɪˈvɛndʒ)
n. diarrhea; tourist diarrhea. (Refers to tourists in Mexico.) I had a little touch of Montezuma’s revenge the second day, but other than that we had a wonderful time.
See also: revenge

Montezuma's revenge

Traveler’s diarrhea, contracted by travelers in Mexico but elsewhere as well. The expression alludes to Montezuma, the last Aztec emperor. and dates from the mid-1900s. Tennessee Williams used it in The Night of the Iguana, as have many other writers. Another name for the condition is Aztec two-step, but that has not become widespread.
See also: revenge
References in classic literature ?
Billy pointed out the mouth of the slough and across the broad reach of water to a cluster of tiny white buildings, behind which, like a glimmering mirage, rolled the low Montezuma Hills.
The tiny white houses of Collinsville, which they were nearing, disappeared behind a low island, though the Montezuma Hills, with their long, low, restful lines, slumbered on the horizon apparently as far away as ever.
As the Roamer passed the mouth of Montezuma Slough and entered the Sacramento, they came upon Collinsville close at hand.
Ahead, on the left bank of the Sacramento, just at the fading end of the Montezuma Hills, Rio Vista appeared.
Pimas, called "Montezumas," listened to him and opposed the allotment program.
Spicer subsequently notes that in 1925 an opposition group, the League of Papago Chiefs, formed for the purpose of holding out "for traditional ways and a minimum of interference in village affairs by the superintendent and his assistants." Support came, not only from traditionalists, but also from "those conservatives sometimes called 'Montezumas' who had listened with approval to Dr.
What follows is an account of how Yavapai writer and activist Carlos Montezuma (ca.
With respect to the reservation system, Montezuma was unequivocal in his condemnation of the Indian Bureau's mishandling of health and education services.
What Montezuma wanted, above all, was for Indians to enjoy the same rights and privileges that their white--albeit, typically male and especially privileged--counterparts took for granted as US citizens.
Montezuma inveighed against the Indian Bureau's plans:
Spicer then makes a surprising claim about Montezuma's role in "religious diversification": "Strictly speaking, it [Montezuma's influence] was not a religious movement in the sense of resting on supernatural belief.
Whatever the influence, Spicer affirms that Montezuma's influence was "based chiefly on the dignity and worth of the Indian racial and cultural heritage," and that Montezuma preached that Indigenous values and beliefs were superior to white Americans; moreover, that Indians ought to turn to their own ways, instead of mainstream society.
Spicer notwithstanding, since the scholarly community is generally more focused on written documents, it is unsurprising that historians have portrayed Montezuma in a different light.
Among these juveniles are Dab Kinzer (1881), The Red Mustang (1890), Little Smoke: A Tale of the Sioux (1891), The Lost Gold of the Montezumas (1897), and The Spy of Yorktown (1903).
But we don't need any excuse to break into the delish organic bars hand-made by Montezuma's...