Monday morning quarterback

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Monday morning quarterback

A person who acts like they have all the answers to a problem, especially in hindsight, usually without having any experience in that area. Likened to fans and commentators who criticize a football team after a Sunday game. Primarily heard in US. Social media seems to have turned everyone into a Monday morning quarterback whenever political issues are discussed.

Monday-morning quarterback

A person who criticizes or passes judgment from a position of hindsight, as in Ethel was a Monday-morning quarterback about all the personnel changes in her department-she always claimed to have known what was going to happen . This expression, first recorded in 1932, alludes to fans who verbally "replay" Sunday's football game the next day, the quarterback being the team member who calls the plays.
See also: quarterback

a Monday morning quarterback

AMERICAN
A Monday morning quarterback, is someone who criticizes others after something has happened by saying that they should have dealt with it differently, although the people involved could not have known what would happen. It is very easy to play Monday morning quarterback, and I do not envy the choices put before a great many of the world's leaders. Note: You can also accuse someone of Monday morning quarterbacking. The Attorney rejects such Monday-morning quarterbacking, insisting that his lawyers did, quote, `an excellent job'. Note: In American football, the quarterback is usually the player who calls out signals which tell the team which moves to make. In the United States, most professional football games are played on Sunday. A `Monday morning quarterback' is someone, usually a man, who tells people what the coach should have done to win the game.

Monday morning quarterback

a person who is wise after the event. North American
In American football, a quarterback is the player stationed behind the centre who directs the team's attacking play. In North American English the word has also developed the sense of ‘a person who directs or coordinates an operation or project’. A Monday morning quarterback is someone who passes judgement on something or criticizes it when it is too late for their comments to be of any use, since the particular game or project in question has finished or been completed.

ˌMonday morning ˈquarterback

(American English, informal, disapproving) a person who criticizes or comments on an event after it has happened: It’s easy to play Monday morning quarterback and say that he made a poor decision. ▶ ˌMonday morning ˈquarterback verb criticize or comment on an event after it has happened: I don’t like to Monday morning quarterback any work that is done by another investigator. ˌMonday morning ˈquarterbacking noun: This is the worst kind of Monday-morning quarterbacking.The quarterback directs the play in an American football game. Most games are played on a Sunday so Monday morning is the day after the game finished.

Monday-morning quarterback

A person who criticizes decisions or actions after the fact, with twenty-twenty hindsight. The term originated in the 1930s when football as a spectator sport was seen mostly on weekends, and office discussions of the previous weekend’s game would often be dominated by one or more “experts” who “revised” the quarterback’s instructions to the team so as to achieve superior results. In print the term appeared in Barry Wood’s What Price Football (1932), in which he applied it to sportswriters who were not content with reporting the game but felt they had to analyze it. In succeeding decades it was transferred to anyone second-guessing any past decision.
See also: quarterback
References in periodicals archive ?
Monday morning quarterbacks do not help win the next game much less the game just played.
As a result, "there are no Monday morning quarterbacks looking out and wondering if this expenditure was required," says Volpe.
had in mind backseat drivers and Monday morning quarterbacks such as A.R.E., who, at least so far as the military sphere was concerned, was an outside observer.
The "Monday morning quarterbacks'' hailed the Taste of Sterling as being fresh, fun, social and full of community, certainly an event that warrants a sequel.
Now that the wider community is beginning to recognize the threat, Johnny-come-latelies, Monday Morning quarterbacks, and assorted wanna-bes may try to steal the spotlight.
In retrospect all those "Monday morning quarterbacks" should have just paid attention to, you know, actual quarterbacks.
Those Monday morning quarterbacks theorize that Autzen's asymmetrical shape actually allows more sound to escape the stadium.
Monday morning quarterbacks always make perfect decisions.
Monday morning quarterbacks are the NFL fans who get all the ink, but I get to talk about the sport on a Friday, weeks before the season begins.