Mexican standoff


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Mexican standoff

slang An impasse, deadlock, or stalemate from which no party involved will or can emerge victorious. Also written "stand-off." (Note: This phrase may be considered offensive to Mexicans or those of Mexican heritage.) Primarily heard in US. No one on the board of directors was willing to compromise their position on the issue, and with each of us having veto power, it looked like we were heading into a Mexican standoff.
See also: Mexican
References in periodicals archive ?
The layering of analog and digital techniques for production and reproduction is central to the work's meaning, but Mexican Standoff is no mere display of technique.
Many of the songs on Leaders Of The Free World, such as A Mexican Standoff, The Stops and My Very Best, deal with jealousy in a relationship and the heartbreak of it ending.
So if this is a chicken-and-egg situation in which the media culture and the population that devours it are sort of waiting in a Mexican standoff for the other to do the better thing, we'll get nowhere.
It's a Mexican standoff," says Siobhan Manning, emerging markets analyst at PaineWebber.
Gilbert described the scene in Albany as a Mexican standoff between Governor Mario N.
I was once late for a meeting with a Hollywood producer because I'd been embroiled in a Mexican standoff with a three-year-old who refused to remove his night-time, Buzz Lightyear pull-up pants.
Arkansas Traveler (sic) and Mexican Standoff show that despite her committed political stance she has no geographic allegiance.
Singer-songwriter Shocked serves up gutsy guitar album Don't Ask Don't Tell, a Tex-Mex collection titled Mexican Standoff and Got No Strings, which revises Disney favourites with startling results.
Great Expectations is the sound of a band that could be the 21st century's answer to Pink Floyd, though Mexican Standoff - a sleazy, aural tranquilliser - is everything Coldplay could be but aren't.
This in between riots, 5,000-round firefights, speedboat chases faster and more dangerous than anything in ``Speed 2,'' those geometric Mexican standoff scenes - in churches - that Woo loves so much, and all manner of incidental mayhem.