method

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Related to Methods: Research methods

have (a) method in (one's) madness

To have a specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may seem crazy or absurd to another person. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles, you'll see that I have a method in my madness. You may have method in your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic.
See also: have, madness, method

have (a) method to (one's) madness

To have a specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may seem crazy or absurd to another person. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles, you'll see that I have a method to my madness. You may have method to your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic.
See also: have, madness, method

there is (a) method to (one's) madness

There is a specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may seem crazy or absurd to another person. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles, you'll see that there is a method to my madness. There may be method to your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic.
See also: madness, method, there

method in (one's) madness

A specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may seem crazy or absurd to another person. Originated in Shakespeare's Hamlet: "Though this be madness, yet there is method in it." He may seem scattered and disorganized, but I guarantee there's a method in his madness.
See also: madness, method

(a) method in (one's) madness

A specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may appear crazy or absurd to another person. Usually used in the phrase "have/there is (a) method in (one's) madness." You may have method in your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles you'll see that there is a method in my madness.
See also: madness, method

(a) method to (one's) madness

A specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may appear crazy or absurd to another person. Usually used in the phrase "have/there is (a) method to (one's) madness." You may have method to your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles you'll see that there is a method to my madness.
See also: madness, method

there is (a) method in (one's) madness

There is a specific, rational purpose in what one is doing or planning, even though it may seem crazy or absurd to another person. I know you don't understand my motivation for this decision, but after the dust settles you'll see that there is a method in my madness. You may have method in your madness, but these radical changes to the business could still prove catastrophic.
See also: madness, method, there

*method in one's madness

Fig. a purpose in what one is doing, even though it seems to be crazy. (*Typically: be ~; have ~.) What I'm doing may look strange, but there is method in my madness. Wait until she finishes; then you'll see that she has method in her madness.
See also: madness, method

method in one's madness

An underlying purpose in crazy behavior, as in Harry takes seemingly random trips around the country but there's method to his madness-he's checking on real estate values . This expression comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet (2:2): "Though this be madness, yet there is method in it." For a modern equivalent, see crazy like a fox.
See also: madness, method

there is method in someone's madness

If you say there is method in someone's madness, you mean that although what they do seems strange, they have a good reason for doing it. Of course, there's method in her madness because an empty fridge means I have to take her out to dinner. Note: People also say there is method in the madness. This sounds like pointless technology, but there is method in the madness.
See also: madness, method, there

there is method in someone's madness

there is a sensible foundation for what appears to be foolish or strange behaviour.
This expression comes from the scene in Hamlet in which Hamlet feigns madness, causing Polonius to remark: ‘Though this be madness, yet there is method in't’.
See also: madness, method, there

there’s ˌmethod in somebody’s ˈmadness

there is a reason for your behaviour and it is not as strange or as stupid as it seems: ‘Why do you always read your newspaper backwards?’ ‘Ah, there’s method in my madness — the back pages are where the sport is.’This comes from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet: ‘Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t (= in it).’
See also: madness, method

method to one's madness

Do things in an unorthodox fashion, yet nevertheless achieve the intended result. Yet again Shakespeare's Hamlet provided a phrase that was picked up and used through the ages. Having observed Hamlet rave on in what appeared to be senseless sentences, Polonious makes a comment that turns out to be true: “Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.” Under less dramatic circumstances, the phrase applies to getting the right outcome by what seems to be the wrong method, and we've all done that.
See also: madness, method
References in classic literature ?
To make this plain by an example, suppose a geometrician is demonstrating the method of cutting a line in two equal parts.
The method employed appears to me hardly to fulfil the conditions of scientific experiment.
Especially, there is nothing to be made in this way without method.
But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
Your sociology is as vicious and worthless as is your method of thinking.
What is so dreadfully vicious and worthless in our method of thinking, young man?
It is Adeimantus again who volunteers the criticism of common sense on the Socratic method of argument, and who refuses to let Socrates pass lightly over the question of women and children.
The Socratic method is nominally retained; and every inference is either put into the mouth of the respondent or represented as the common discovery of him and Socrates.
Though we have properly enough entitled this our work, a history, and not a life; nor an apology for a life, as is more in fashion; yet we intend in it rather to pursue the method of those writers, who profess to disclose the revolutions of countries, than to imitate the painful and voluminous historian, who, to preserve the regularity of his series, thinks himself obliged to fill up as much paper with the detail of months and years in which nothing remarkable happened, as he employs upon those notable aeras when the greatest scenes have been transacted on the human stage.
Now it is our purpose, in the ensuing pages, to pursue a contrary method.
And doubtless the method is little changed, for there is nothing new under the sun, especially at schools.
The only objection to the traditionary method of doing your vulguses was the risk that the successions might have become confused, and so that you and another follower of traditions should show up the same identical vulgus some fine morning; in which case, when it happened, considerable grief was the result.
His was an original brain, very intelligent but--without method.
The method which traces the criminal by means of the tracks of his footsteps is altogether primitive.
Conceived in the same mood which produced "Almayer's Folly" and "An Outcast of the Islands," it is told in the same breath (with what was left of it, that is, after the end of "An Outcast"), seen with the same vision, rendered in the same method--if such a thing as method did exist then in my conscious relation to this new adventure of writing for print.
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