March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb

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March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb

Because March straddles winter and spring in the northern hemisphere, it tends to have very harsh, unpleasant weather in the beginning but typically has milder, more palatable weather by the end. The phrase is often rearranged, separated, or otherwise slightly reworded. A: "I just wanted this awful cold weather to be over!" B: "It shouldn't be much longer now. March always comes in like a lion, but it goes out like a lamb." March usually goes out like a lamb, but it's been a lion from beginning to end this year!
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March comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb,

 and In like a lion, out like a lamb.
Prov. The month of March usually starts with cold, unpleasant weather, but ends mild and pleasant. (Either part of the proverb can be used alone.) March certainly is coming in like a lion this year; there's been a snowstorm every day this week. Jill: Today is March twenty-fifth, and it's beautiful and warm outside, when just two weeks ago, everything was covered with ice. Jane: In like a lion and out like a lamb, all right.
See also: and, come, goes, lamb, like, march, out