manhood

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(one's) manhood

1. One's masculine identity or attributes. It doesn't diminish your manhood to discuss your feelings more openly. He felt like his manhood was being threatened when his wife started making more money than him.
2. euphemism One's penis and/or testicles. She kicked her date in his manhood when he started getting aggressive with her. You're a fool if you don't wear an athletic cup to protect your manhood out on the field.
See also: manhood

manhood

n. penis. His reflexes automatically protect his manhood.
References in classic literature ?
I waded through the mud, shoving the skiff before me and yammering the chant of my manhood to the world.
Mugambi from childhood had eaten no meat until it had been cooked, while Tarzan, on the other hand, had never tasted cooked food of any sort until he had grown almost to manhood, and only within the past three or four years had he eaten cooked meat.
All of virtue and chivalry and true manhood which his old guardian had neglected to inculcate in the boy's mind the good priest planted there, but he could not eradicate his deep-seated hatred for the English or his belief that the real test of manhood lay in a desire to fight to the death with a sword.
I had believed in the best parlour as a most elegant saloon; I had believed in the front door, as a mysterious portal of the Temple of State whose solemn opening was attended with a sacrifice of roast fowls; I had believed in the kitchen as a chaste though not magnificent apartment; I had believed in the forge as the glowing road to manhood and independence.
Immoral, licentious, anarchical, unscientific -- call them by what names you will -- yet, from an aesthetic point of view, those ancient days of the Colour Revolt were the glorious childhood of Art in Flatland -- a childhood, alas, that never ripened into manhood, nor even reached the blossom of youth.
Possessed myself of a strong stomach and a hard head, inured to hardship, cruelty, and brutality, nevertheless I found, as I came to manhood, that I unconsciously protected myself from the hurt of the trained-animal turn by getting up and leaving the theatre whenever such turns came on the stage.