Mandela effect

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Mandela effect

A phenomenon involving a large group of people all incorrectly remembering a past event or fact. The phrase is named for the purportedly widespread misconception that Nelson Mandela died in the 1980s while in prison. (Mandela died in 2013 after having served as president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999 following his release from prison in 1990.) Apparently, the company's name was always spelled that way, so you guys remembering it differently must be the Mandela effect.
See also: effect
References in periodicals archive ?
'Free yourself, free others, serve every day are the three rules that Nelson Mandela followed throughout his life, which he did at a great personal sacrifice,' the envoy said.
He said that he had a deep respect in context of struggle for independence and a special affinity to Pakistan as it is one of the few countries that Nelson Mandela visited twice, adding that the Pakistan government presented the country's highest civil award, Nishan-e-Pakistan, to Mandela.
Unlike most of us who continue to sow seeds of hate and division, from his years as a revolutionary and being imprisoned on Robben Island to his release and on to the presidency, Mandela lived and died fighting for African unity.Mandela spoke his mind with courage and care without hesitation to correct and rebuke those who sought to further animosity.
They were acquitted, but the trial put Mandela at the top of the government's enemies list.
"At this point, where there is a resurgence of emphasising difference around the world, I think we need to fight very hard so that we don't roll back the gains that have been made so far." Work on a permanent memorial garden to the anti-apartheid icon will begin shortly, with a pavilion featuring 32 cylindrical stoneworks inscribed with quotes from Nelson Mandela, and a Freedom Bridge across the lake.
Items in the exhibition include one of the pick axes which Mandela and his colleagues used in the lime quarry on Robben Island, and a letter of thanks from Mandela to the British public, written on April 16, 1990, the day he attended the Nelson Mandela: An International Tribute for a Free South Africa concert at Wembley Stadium.
During her address at the plenary event organised to commemorate Mandela's birth centenary, Swaraj shed light on how the former South African president's life continues to inspire people across the globe even in the present day.
Mandela's first demonstration against the government was in 1952.
He also quoted Mandela that 'Education is the most powerful weapon that you can use to change the world'.
The lecture on Tuesday took place a day before Nelson Mandela International Day.Former President Sirleaf, former UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon were among several others at the lecture.
Mandela continued his philanthropy for years to come, but succumbed to a respiratory infection in 2013.
During celebrations, a video screening on Mandela's life would also be organized followed by storytelling, quiz and painting competition among the children of PSH.
Mandela's book was released last month in honor of what would have been the year of his grandfather's 100th birthday, and he recently traveled to cities across the United States including New York, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Malibu promoting the book.
"I am deeply saddened by the passing of the former wife of Nelson Mandela and anti-apartheid activist and icon, Winnie Mandela.
Often called the "Mother of the Nation" and "Mama Winnie," Madikizela-Mandela fought to keep South Africa's anti-apartheid struggle in the international spotlight while her husband, Nelson Mandela, was imprisoned.