maggot

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act the maggot

behave in a foolishly playful way. Irish informal
See also: act, maggot

maggot

1. n. a cigarette. (Probably a play on faggot.) Can I bum a maggot off of you?
2. n. a low and wretched person; a vile person. You maggot! Take your hands off me!
References in periodicals archive ?
The treatment lasts for three days and the size of the maggots when they come off is incredible.
Seraticin is made from the maggot secretions of the common green bottle fly.
Maggots are currently used for treating conditions such as leg ulcers, pressure sores and other infected surgical wounds.
She said: "Patients often say the maggots just look like a ball of cotton scrunched up.
They said wounds including ulcers can be cleaned more quickly if maggots were used, so that patients spent less time in hospital - potentially saving the NHS up to pounds 30 million.
Apple maggot flies are fooled by an apple-sized sphere painted black, which like a red apple does not reflect ultraviolet light.
But the use of maggots was forgotten when antibiotics were discovered, until the 1980s, when their influence on injury management was looked at again.
Maggots provide a gentle and safe "biological debridement" of refractory wounds and can promote wound healing.
Feeder fishing with red maggot and pinkies is catching skimmers, hybrids and roach.
According to a recent British survey, 95 percent of doctors who have used maggot therapy were pleased with the results.
Inmates at category C Kennet jail planned to sue the Prison Service after "finding" maggots in the meals.
JAMIE Oliver has had a Kitchen Nightmare - after a diner at his restaurant was stunned to see maggots falling on to his lunch.
Maggots also cause walnut husks to become slimy and sticky, which blackens the walnut shells, making them unmarketable and the nutmeat difficult to process (Poland et al.
July 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- DJ Ass Maggots, a pseudonym for a physician practicing internal medicine with an emphasis on geriatric care, announced today the release of his second book, "Poseidon's Tunnel," to audiences worldwide.
They are attracted to dirty, unhygienic conditions to lay their eggs which then hatch into maggots.