magazine

(redirected from Magazines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Magazines: cosmopolitan
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

have (one's) nose in a book

To be reading a book. Often used of people who always seem to be reading. He's had his nose in a book for the entire camping trip. I wish he would take a break and enjoy the scenery. Poor Mary is so shy. She just has her nose in a book wherever she goes.
See also: book, have, nose

have (one's) nose in a magazine

To be reading a magazine. Often used of people who always seem to be reading. He's had his nose in a magazine for the entire camping trip. I wish he would take a break and enjoy the scenery. Poor Mary is so shy. She just has her nose in a magazine wherever she goes.
See also: have, magazine, nose

have your nose in a ˈbook, magaˈzine, etc.

(informal) be reading something and giving it all your attention: She’s always got her nose in a book.
See also: have, nose

girlie magazine

n. a magazine featuring pictures of nude women. The girlie magazines were hidden under the counter.
See also: girlie, magazine
References in periodicals archive ?
This message is the offspring of a collaborative public-private partnership titled ReMix (Recycling Magazines Is Excellent).
Books from magazines generate an additional (important) revenue stream and additional branding,'' adds Rux Martin, executive editor, Houghton Mifflin.
Rooks's investigation of selected African American women's magazines from the 1890s to the 1950s.
But there are many magazines in the field that may not be reliable any longer.
But with the financial perks of publishing come many pitfalls that publishers must navigate if they are to not only get their magazines off the ground, but also sustain them for years while remaining competitive.
Thus, Pendergast's study of the role that men's magazines played in encouraging men to think of themselves as consumers is an important addition to the growing history of men and popular culture.
The first strategy targets small magazines with a paper-buyers cooperative that provides 100 percent post-consumer paper," says Anner.
Now, many of the best political journalists in the country are signed up by glossy magazines such as George, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, and GQ -- all of which pay a living wage rather than the 15 to 20 cents a word TNR pays freelancers.
I hadn't looked at any of those magazines in a long time when I heard about the publication of a new one aimed at the twenty- and thirty-something group.
The authors of the books that deal with contemporary artworks as they recede into the past, either to disappear there or to take their shadowy place in the museum and the enduring record, rely on various sources of information--notably exhibition catalogues, which are enormously influential records--but it is the magazines that stitch the history of their time in the most complete and seamless fabric.
Two technological advances and a competing medium greatly altered the appearance of magazines after World War II, and, at the beginning of the 1990s, their impact continues to be felt.
By collecting unsold magazines and putting them into the hands of new readers, paper once destined for the shredder or dumpster is being given a second life in the public mainstream.
Two new magazines born from pop-culture icons are making the loudest noise in this year's annual parade of new magazines.