mood

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be in a bad mood

To be cranky, unhappy, or surly. The boss is really in a bad mood today, so I'd steer clear of him if you don't want to get screamed at.
See also: bad, mood

be in no mood for (something)

To be annoyed and unwilling to do or tolerate something. Please calm down—I'm in no mood for silliness today.
See also: mood, no

be in the mood for (something)

To have a desire or craving for something or to do something. I don't know why, but I'm really in the mood for ice cream today. Dad's just not in the mood to go out to dinner tonight.
See also: mood

get in a bad mood

To become cranky, unhappy, or surly. The boss really got in a bad mood in that meeting, so I'd steer clear of him if you don't want to get screamed at.
See also: bad, get, mood

in a bad mood

Cranky, unhappy, or surly. The boss is really in a bad mood today, so I'd steer clear of him if you don't want to get screamed at.
See also: bad, mood

in a good mood

Feeling happy or pleasant. The boss is in a good mood today, so he might take news of the printing error well.
See also: good, mood

in a mood

Cranky, unhappy, or surly. The boss is really in a mood today, so I'd steer clear of him if you don't want to get screamed at.
See also: mood

in a/the mood to (do something)

Likely to or interested in doing something. I don't think the boss is in the mood to talk about raises today—maybe tomorrow. I'm kind of in a mood to go on a hike today. Want to join me?
See also: mood

in no mood

Annoyed and unwilling to do or tolerate something. Please calm down—I'm in no mood to deal with silliness today. I'm in no mood, so if you're going to whine, take it to Dad.
See also: mood, no

in no mood to (do something)

Annoyed and unwilling to do or tolerate something. Please calm down—I'm in no mood to deal with silliness today.
See also: mood, no

in the mood

1. Interested in something I don't know why, but I'm really in the mood for ice cream today.
2. Wanting to do something. Dad's just not in the mood to go out to dinner tonight.
See also: mood

in the mood for (something)

Having a desire or craving for something or to do something. I don't know why, but I'm really in the mood for ice cream today. Dad's just not in the mood to go out to dinner tonight.
See also: mood

put (one) in a bad mood

To cause one to become cranky, unhappy, or surly. Based on the yelling I'm hearing coming from his office, the latest expense report has really put the boss in a bad mood.
See also: bad, mood, put

*in a bad mood

sad; depressed; grouchy; with low spirits. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; put someone ~.) He's in a bad mood. He may yell at you. Please try to cheer me up. I'm in a bad mood.
See also: bad, mood

in no mood to do something

not feeling like doing something; not wishing to do something. I'm in no mood to cook dinner tonight. Mother is in no mood to put up with our arguing.
See also: mood, no

in the mood (for something)

 and in the mood (to do something)
having the proper state of mind for a particular situation or for doing something. I'm not in the mood to see a movie tonight. Are you in the mood for pizza?
See also: mood

in a bad mood

In an irritable or depressed state of mind. For example, Dad's in a bad mood, so don't ask for anything right now. The antonym, in a good mood, refers to a cheerful, well-disposed state of mind, as in When the boss is in a good mood our whole day goes well. The phrase in a mood, meaning "disposed" or "inclined," dates from about a.d. 1000. Also see in the mood.
See also: bad, mood

in the mood

Disposed or inclined toward something, as in I'm in the mood for a good long walk. This phrase is also put in the negative, I'm not in the mood to argue. [Late 1500s]
See also: mood

be in the mood for something/for doing something

,

be in the mood to do something

have a strong desire to do something; feel like doing something: I’m in the mood for going out and having a good time.She said she wasn’t in the mood to dance.
See also: mood, something

be in no mood for something/for doing something

,

be in no mood to do something

not want to do something; not feel like doing something: I’m in no mood for jokes — just tell me the truth.
See also: mood, no, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, Forgas contends, "everyday moods have a subtle but reliable influence on communication strategies."
Now that her nonprofit is off and running, she hopes to create more products that engage all the senses and lift moods.
"Everyone can experience low mood from time to time, however low mood can turn into depression when it becomes more frequently experienced, and begins to affect your relationships and your ability to work.
They concluded that everything zeroed down to the mood of the woman.
According to her, as a professional musician, she has learnt never to allow her to determine her mood whether she made music or not.
[USA], Sep 11 (ANI): Turns out, mood variations can be decoded from neural signals in the human brain, a process that has not been demonstrated till date.
Using mathematical modelling they found that having more friends who suffer worse moods is linked with being more likely to have bad moods.
The results that show that low mood, which was easily passed, and depression which was not passed via social groups, are inherently different.
Maybe the whole point of feelings and moods is to test the limits of our imaginations, requiring a moment-to-moment recreation of images that gambol and lurch, elegant as monsters caught inside the scrim of a shadow-puppet board.
What may be most discouraging about this normal human condition is that if we begin our day in a bad mood, we are likely to remain moody and unapproachable for the entire day.
People born at certain times of the year have a far greater chance of developing certain types of temperaments, which can lead to mood disorders, the telegraph reported.
In addition, we aimed to show that when consumers are in a positive mood, they are more likely to perceive scarcity as a sales tactic; thus, the positive effect of scarcity claims in a positive mood condition will be weaker than it is in a negative mood condition.
Hence, we focused on the effect of moods experienced by learners as enduring states (e.g., feeling "good" versus "bad") rather than short-lived emotions (e.g., surprise, fear, anger).
But can your diet really help put you in a good mood? And can avoiding certain food and drinks discourage low spells or even depression?