lie to (one)

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Related to Lying to: lying around

lie to (one)

To tell one an untruth or falsehood. Don't lie to me—was it you who took the money? He's been lying to his employees for months about the state of the company.
See also: lie

lie to someone (about someone or something)

to tell an untruth about someone or something to someone. You wouldn't lie to me about Sarah, would you? I'm not lying to you!
See also: lie
References in periodicals archive ?
The question about whether your child lying to you is good, needs to be rephrased to ask why your child feels they need to lie to you.
In addition to lying to journalists, then, Rogers lied about journalists.
These results not only support our hypothesis that undergraduates who lie more frequently than their peers have low self-esteem, high anxiety, and impaired psychological health (e.g., nervousness and melancholy), but also accord with the findings in previous studies on lying to parents (Engels et al., 2006; Gervais et al., 2000).
The right to do wrong: Lying to parents among adolescents and emerging adults.
Pinocchio could never get away with lying to his mate Jiminy Cricket.
Bill Clinton suffered the ultimate disgrace and apologized to the American people for lying to them.
If you consider the tax code oppressive, are you justified in lying to the IRS?
Clinton may have lied to preserve his power while telling himself that he was lying to protect "the people" who benefited from his presidency.
"When you're in a relationship, you have certain motivations to see your partner in a particular way, and you especially don't want to think they are lying to you," says Bella DePaulo, a University of Virginia psychologist.
He finds lying to be a kind and loving art that keeps fragile relationships intact.
Deception in some situations is questionable, however, lying to clients is not.
If you tell your son that his grandpa is on a long trip when he died, don't be surprised when he starts lying to you.
Meanwhile, 13 coal companies admitted last month (after a three-year Department of Labor investigation) to lying to their workers and the government about the amount of disease-causing coal dust in the mine air.
The Watergate special prosecutor proposed charging Kleindienst with perjury for lying to the Senate Judiciary Committee about Nixon's role in the case; after pleabargaining, Kleindienst pleaded guilty to reduced charges.