free translation

(redirected from Loose Translation)
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free translation

 and loose translation
a translation or restatement that is not completely accurate and not well thought out; a translation or restatement done casually. John gave a free translation of what our Japanese client asked for, and we missed the main issue. Anne gave a very free translation of the ancient Chinese poem.
See also: free, translation
References in periodicals archive ?
Edward Fitzgerald's loose translation of the ruba' iat, written by Omar ibn Ibrahim al-Khayyam who lived from 1048-1131 must rank as one of the most famous 'translations' in literary history.
Afterward, in the unique postgame interviews that occur in international settings, there was some more loose translation.
That is, FitzGerald's loose translation style, applied to Greek, irritated Swinburne as profoundly as Browning's grindingly literal approach.
The Rahbani brothers wrote most of Fairouz's work, including Sah al-Nom (Good Morning in a loose translation from Arabic).
The commercial release of "Nuestro Himno" (Our Anthem), a loose translation of America's National Anthem, the "Star-Spangled Banner," has started a sharp debate over what it means to be an American and if the United States will remain an English-speaking nation.
This year's motto, written in Elvish by former head coach Melinda Owen, was a loose translation of a line from Mozart's ``The Marriage of Figaro'': ``I get no sleep by night or day but yet I enjoy suffering this way.
Not only is it a loose translation, these critics insist, it flirts with heresy by suggesting that all human beings will be saved regardless of their moral choices or religious affiliation.
One loose translation makes it sound like that old love song, "You made me love you," and this is no complaint.
A loose translation of the entire name would be something like this: "(Saint) Mary's' church by the pool of the white hazels dose to the fierce whirlpool by [Saint] Tysilio's church near the red cave.
And the loose translation is, "By 2031 people who are retired - or thinking about retirement - will be the voters who will make or break a political party.
So I know I wasn't alone in seizing the moment to re-assess the pope-ability (a tremendously loose translation of that chic Italian term, papabile, or good pope material) of the members of that venerable body of ecclesial field marshals.
That we are such debts to death means, according to one of Carson's lovely loose translations of Simonides, that we are advised "to play at life and to be 100% serious about nothing.
These are loose translations from the eighth-century poet Li Bai (also known as Li Po).