a London particular

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a London particular

dated A euphemism for the thick, brown, sometimes lethal fog caused by air pollution in London, especially during the 19th and early 20th century. For many older citizens living London during that time, they could as easily be killed by a London particular as by an attack from a criminal.
See also: particular

a London particular

a dense fog formerly affecting London. dated
This expression is first recorded in Charles Dickens's Bleak House ( 1853 ).
See also: particular
References in classic literature ?
Wharves, landing-places, dock-gates, waterside stairs, follow each other continuously right up to London Bridge, and the hum of men's work fills the river with a menacing, muttering note as of a breathless, ever-driving gale.
This stretch of the Thames from London Bridge to the Albert Docks is to other watersides of river ports what a virgin forest would be to a garden.
I had now arrived at that particular point of my walk where four roads met--the road to Hampstead, along which I had returned, the road to Finchley, the road to West End, and the road back to London.
I have read, in another account of these events, that on Sunday morning "all London was electrified by the news from Woking.
Why, no; I entered his service the very day we left London.
But Monk, free and without uneasiness, marched towards London as a conqueror, augmenting his army with all the floating parties on his way.
It was one of those rare afternoons when all the thickness and shadow of London are changed to a kind of shining, pulsing, special atmosphere; when the smoky vapors become fluttering golden clouds, nacreous veils of pink and amber; when all that bleakness of gray stone and dullness of dirty brick trembles in aureate light, and all the roofs and spires, and one great dome, are floated in golden haze.
I agree, but Helen rather wants to get away from London.
She regarded it (once her clothes were ordered) as merely an enlarged opportunity for walking, riding, swimming, and trying her hand at the fascinating new game of lawn tennis; and when they finally got back to London (where they were to spend a fortnight while he ordered HIS clothes) she no longer concealed the eagerness with which she looked forward to sailing.
I had seen Penelope and my lady's maid off in the railway with the luggage for London, and was pottering about the grounds, when I heard my name called.
After this escape, I was content to take a foggy view of the Inn through the window's encrusting dirt, and to stand dolefully looking out, saying to myself that London was decidedly overrated.
And, what's more, he has persuaded her (for some reasons of his own) to leave London next week.
I have had an answer from your employers in London," said Mr.
At all events, the veil of self-consciousness was rent in twain at that remark, and our spirits rushed together at this touch of London nature thus unexpectedly revealed.
Taking his master's degree after seven years at Cambridge, in 1587, he followed the other 'university wits' to London.