London


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a London particular

dated A euphemism for the thick, brown, sometimes lethal fog caused by air pollution in London, especially during the 19th and early 20th century. For many older citizens living London during that time, they could as easily be killed by a London particular as by an attack from a criminal.
See also: London, particular

first (some place), then the world

1. cliché First this location will be conquered, and then in the near future we will conquer the world. "First France, then the world!" cackled the evil leader, as his army poured out of the stronghold and swept across the country.
2. By extension, we will first find success in this location, then that success will quickly spread to the rest of the world. I have a feeling that this product could revolutionize the way the entire planet consumes media. First the United States, then the world!
See also: first, world

today (some place), tomorrow the world

1. cliché First this location will be conquered, soon to be followed by the entire world. "Today France, tomorrow the world!" cackled the evil leader, as his army poured out of the stronghold and swept across the country.
2. By extension, we will first find success in this location, then that success will quickly spread to the rest of the world. I have a feeling that this product could revolutionize the way the entire planet consumes media. Today the United States, tomorrow the world!
See also: today, tomorrow, world

a London particular

a dense fog formerly affecting London. dated
This expression is first recorded in Charles Dickens's Bleak House ( 1853 ).
See also: London, particular
References in classic literature ?
Behind the growth of the London waterside the docks of London spread out unsuspected, smooth, and placid, lost amongst the buildings like dark lagoons hidden in a thick forest.
To break windows is the last thing one would think of in connection with a ship's topgallant yard, unless, indeed, one were an experienced berthing-master in one of the London docks.
There, in the middle of the broad bright high-road--there, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth or dropped from the heaven--stood the figure of a solitary Woman, dressed from head to foot in white garments, her face bent in grave inquiry on mine, her hand pointing to the dark cloud over London, as I faced her.
No one in London knew positively of the nature of the armoured Martians, and there was still a fixed idea that these monsters must be sluggish: "crawling," "creeping painfully" --such expressions occurred in almost all the earlier reports.
The hasty departure from London soon after the robbery; the large sum carried by Mr.
Suddenly, when least expected, Monk drove the military party out of London, and installed himself in the city amidst the citizens, by order of the parliament; then, at the moment when the citizens were crying out against Monk -- at the moment when the soldiers themselves were accusing their leader -- Monk, finding himself certain of a majority, declared to the Rump Parliament that it must abdicate -- be dissolved -- and yield its place to a government which would not be a joke.
After miles of outlying streets and little gloomy houses, they reached London itself, red and roaring and murky, with a thick dampness coming up from the river, that betokened fog again to-morrow.
The flats, their only outlook, hung like an ornate curtain between Margaret and the welter of London. Her thoughts turned sadly to house-hunting.
She regarded it (once her clothes were ordered) as merely an enlarged opportunity for walking, riding, swimming, and trying her hand at the fascinating new game of lawn tennis; and when they finally got back to London (where they were to spend a fortnight while he ordered HIS clothes) she no longer concealed the eagerness with which she looked forward to sailing.
I had a plan for our going to London together like sisters, and living by our needles.
My father thought you would get on more agreeably through to-morrow with me than with him, and might like to take a walk about London. I am sure I shall be very happy to show London to you.
"Of going back to London with you, instead of waiting till the new master comes to take my place."
"You won't expect me to go back to London without seeing Magdalen first?"
London! I hadn't realised till this moment how I had been missing it all these days of rustication, and my heart went out to it with a vast homesickness.
Among the literary adventurers of the age who led wild lives in the London taverns Marlowe is said to have attained a conspicuous reputation for violence and irreligion.