in loco parentis

(redirected from Loco Parentis)
Also found in: Legal.

in loco parentis

Responsible for a child's well-being while his or her parents are absent. Does being a teacher ever make you nervous, having to be in loco parentis to so many young kids?
See also: loco

in ˌloco paˈrentis

(from Latin, formal) having the same responsibility for a child as a parent has: Teachers at a boarding school are acting much more in loco parentis than at a day school.The Latin phrase means in the place of a parent.
See also: loco
References in periodicals archive ?
An important legal concept is 'in loco parentis,' which is Latin for 'in the place of a parent.
The demise of in loco parentis shifted the focus from the parent to the student (Melear, 2003), but now there is a renewed focus on the parent, and what some scholars are calling the new in loco parentis as institutions "accept a duty to protect students from physical harm inflicted through hazing, campus crime, or alcohol abuse" (Melear, 2003, p.
The judge appointed the Chief Secretary and the Advocate General of Rajasthan as persons in loco parentis (custodians) for the protection and conservation of cows.
The construction of a school-wide ethos at Rainbow Hill, along with its risks and rewards, raises important questions for all educators regarding the cooperation between home and school in the development of children's values, the relative value of the school functioning in loco parentis, providing for the religious and spiritual needs of students and families, and the question of children's rights and autonomy in relation to religion.
ACAs shall be in loco parentis, exercising the rights, duties and liabilities of persons exercising substitute parental authority over the children under their foster care.
Before the 1960s, US courts exhibited nearly absolute respect for academia, says Gelber, and most lawsuits filed on behalf of students were undermined by the presumptions that higher education was a privilege rather than a rights, and that colleges acted in loco parentis to serve the minors under their supervision.
Orientations for the new student include content from the in loco parentis model, with lots of rules and regulations to follow.
A teacher is expected to act in loco Parentis in the school around the students, which translates as acting and deciding as a parent on behalf of the child when in school premises and sometimes beyond.
44) This Article argues that it would be detrimental to return "full circle" to the notion that a university should act in loco parentis.
I truly feel we as college mental health psychiatrists are often in the role of in loco parentis, and we make a difference.
Occasionally, plaintiffs asserting [section] 1983 claims against public schools have attempted to show sufficient deprivation giving rise to a special relationship on two bases: state compulsory attendance laws and the legal principle of in loco parentis.
This is irrespective of any consent given by the participant or by a parent, guardian or other person over the age of 18 in loco parentis.
Charities including the National Association for People Abused in Childhood (Napac), The Survivors Trust, Respond, Survivors UK and Innocence in Danger back a law introducing mandatory abuse reporting in schools and similar institutions, where children are cared for in loco parentis.
One of these mechanisms is that a person can stand in loco parentis to a child.
the era of in loco parentis and legal insularity from law suits; the era of successful student battles to win civil rights on campus; the bystander era in which governmental, parental, and charitable immunities fell and no-duty rules emerged; and the doctrinally complex duty era.