Little Lord Fauntleroy


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Little Lord Fauntleroy

An effete and spoiled goody-two-shoes young man. The youngster was the title character of the 19th-century novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett. He lived in New York City with his mother, the daughter of a British lord who had eloped to the States against the wishes of her father. Summoned to England, the lad wins over his grandfather's cold heart through his innate goodness and good sense and becomes heir to the title. Although the title character was not at all spoiled or sissified, his hairstyle and clothing certainly gave that impression. That's why generations of privileged actual or supposed effete spoiled brats were taunted by sneers of “Look—here comes Little Lord Fauntleroy!”
See also: little, lord
References in periodicals archive ?
Comme dans Little Lord Fauntleroy, le double role Stella/ Unity ne repose pas sur une rencontre physique veritable des deux personnages.
While Burnett does not seem to be as interested in how identity forms itself in Little Lord Fauntleroy as she would be in The Secret Garden, she does explore the means of gaining and securing access to English land in both books.
Although the success of Little Lord Fauntleroy eclipsed the popularity of Burnett's other books during her lifetime, The Secret Garden remains one of the most influential children's books ever written.
29) The idea of a bad boy as the normal and healthy boy entered the public arena at this early date, even as it vied with works such as the popular Little Lord Fauntleroy, first published in 1886, the story of a noble, refined, and self-effacing little boy.
Cedric, (I would have like to have called my son this, but his father intervened) Little Lord Fauntleroy, is exactly the role model anyone would want for their son.
It opens on octogenarian Nat Leventhal dressed as Little Lord Fauntleroy.
She is not only to the right of Genghis Kahn and Attila the Hun, but she makes both of them look like Little Lord Fauntleroy.
Little Lord Fauntleroy and his predecessors: the Victorians' saintly child
This strange act of ventriloquism represents the highest form of diva worship and is the direct outcome of my perception in my youth that, as a homosexual, I did not belong in the community in which I lived, that I was different, a castaway from somewhere else, somewhere better, more elegant, more refined, a little Lord Fauntleroy marooned in the wilderness.
In films such as Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Pollyanna and Little Lord Fauntleroy, Pickford played the heroine with idealism and spunk, and a subtle suggestion of the nymphet.
American architecture is composed, in the hundred, of ninety parts aberration, eight parts indifference, one part poverty, and one part Little Lord Fauntleroy.
American playwright and author who wrote the popular novel Little Lord Fauntleroy.
Krassner's conscious life, as he tells it, began when he was performing a solo violin concerto at the age of six, the youngest musician ever to give a concert at Carnegie Hall: "I was wearing a Little Lord Fauntleroy suit - ruffled white silk shirt with puffy sleeves, black velvet short pants with ivory buttons and matching vest - white socks and black patent-leather shoes.
Among books published this year was an immensely popular story for children, Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
Of her approximately fifty books, she is chiefly remembered for two: <IR> LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY </IR> (1886), an enormously popular story of an American-born boy who inherits an English estate, and The Secret Garden (1911), a children's classic telling how a spoiled orphan, Mary, and her sickly cousin, Colin, find health and happiness in restoring a walled and forgotten garden.