lifetime

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a legend in (one's) own lifetime

A person who has an extraordinary level of fame or reputation while they are still alive. The singer has made such a huge impact on the world of blues that she's come to be a legend in her own lifetime.
See also: legend, lifetime, own

chance of a lifetime

An extremely important and/or fortuitous opportunity, especially one that is not likely to ever present itself again. Often (but not always) used hyperbolically. They offered me the chance of a lifetime to travel the world and write about my experiences abroad. Make sure you take advantage of our sale, it's a chance of a lifetime!
See also: chance, lifetime, of

of a lifetime

Used to describe something extremely exceptional, important, or enjoyable that isn't likely to occur again. They offered me the chance of a lifetime to travel the world and write about my experiences abroad. That tour around Europe really was the trip of a lifetime!
See also: lifetime, of

once in a lifetime

Describing something, such as an opportunity, experience, or situation, that seems unlikely to happen again. Often hyphenated when used as a modifier before a noun. You have to take this job in the Zurich office—it's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to live in Switzerland. Chances like this only ever come around once in a lifetime, Jack, so don't waste it.
See also: lifetime, once

once-in-a-lifetime chance

A chance or opportunity afforded to one that is or seems unlikely to ever come about again. This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to manage our European office in Switzerland, so please think about it. I found myself with the once-in-a-lifetime chance to have dinner with the famous author.
See also: chance

once-in-a-lifetime experience

An experience that seems highly unlikely to happen again. Going to Disneyland as a young child is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It's just not the same if you go when you're older.
See also: experience

once-in-a-lifetime opportunity

A chance or opportunity afforded to one that is or seems unlikely to ever come about again. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to manage our European office in Switzerland, so please think about it. I found myself with the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to have dinner with the famous author.
See also: opportunity

once-in-a-lifetime situation

A situation that seems highly unlikely to happen again. Moving all the way to Zurich was supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime situation to get the new office set up. Now they want to send me back there again to run the darn place. It feels like this is a once-in-a-lifetime situation where we actually have the chance to completely change the way the world works.
See also: situation

Why break the habit of a lifetime?

A rhetorical question expressing doubt that someone will change their bad habit. Typically said after that person has announced their intention to stop such a habit. A: "That's it. That's my last cigarette." B: "Why break the habit of a lifetime?"
See also: break, habit, of, why
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

once-in-a-lifetime chance

 and once-in-a-lifetime opportunity
a chance that will never occur again in one's lifetime. This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance. Don't miss it. She offered me a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, but I turned it down.
See also: chance
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

once in a lifetime

Extremely rare, especially as an opportunity. For example, An offer like that will come just once in a lifetime. This phrase, often used hyperbolically, was first recorded in 1854. Also see of one's life.
See also: lifetime, once
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a legend in their own lifetime

a very famous or notorious person.
See also: legend, lifetime, own

of a lifetime

(of a chance or experience) such as does not occur more than once in a person's life; exceptional.
See also: lifetime, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the chance, etc. of a ˈlifetime

a wonderful opportunity, etc. that you are not likely to get again: This is your chance to win the trip of a lifetime!
See also: lifetime, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers found that there was considerable variation in lifetime risks of AD by age, gender, and the preclinical or clinical disease state of the individual.
Table 1 compares the fluorescence lifetimes measured using the RLD method between the epi-fluorescence images and their corresponding HiLo images.
But how much of everything else do we consume in a lifetime? And how much does that weigh in animal terms?
She and her associates at the University of Pittsburgh administered the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV to assess the prevalence of current and lifetime disorders among 207 patients before they underwent bariatric surgery.
"Lifetime Possibilities" can also be thought of as showing the distribution of lifetimes that might occur in a portfolio of life settled cases where all of the insureds are identical to the illustrated insured.
The modulation, M, is insensitive to short lifetimes because it is inversely related to the lifetime, [tau]:
Estimating number of lifetime sexual partners: Men and women do it differently.
Consider that, while Lifetime's primetime lineup includes such female-skewing offnet efforts as "Sisters" and "Designing Women," it also is populated by reruns of "Unsolved Mysteries," "L.A.
This entitles W to plan distributions during her lifetime if H predeceases her.
[9], storage lifetimes were measured together with the flux of UCN thermally up-scattered at the trap walls.
The QSST may have only one current income beneficiary at a time; however, there may be one or more successive lifetime income beneficiaries.
A possible next step in the experimental work, he suggests, would be to determine whether the lifetimes of these trapped-antiproton states depend on the temperature or physical state of helium.
Scientists at NIST have developed a new technology to allow a reliable estimation of the atmospheric lifetimes of halon replacements based on ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.
Common fluorophores include organic dyes, fluorescent protein, quantum dots, and long lifetime metal-ligand complexes (MLCs).