liar

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Related to Liars: sociopath

a/the liar is not believed when he tells the truth

proverb A person who gains a reputation for being dishonest will not be believed about anything, even the truth. You've become so adept at taking advantage of your friends' goodwill, that you're going to run into trouble should you even genuinely need help. The liar is not believed when he tells the truth. You need to stop spinning these tall tales, Frankie, or people will start believing you to be nothing but a liar—and a liar is not believed even when he tells the truth.
See also: believe, he, liar, not, tell, truth

bald-faced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a bald-faced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: liar

barefaced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a barefaced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: barefaced, liar

bold-faced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a bold-faced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: liar

Liar, liar, pants on fire!

A childhood taunt said to someone who is believed to be lying. A: "Liar, liar, pants on fire!" A: "No, my mom is really a magical princess, I swear!" A: "I swear I didn't take that money!" B: "Liar, liar, pants on fire—I saw you take it from Mom's purse this morning!"
See also: on, pant

liars need good memories

proverb If you're going to lie successfully, you need to be able to remember and keep track of your lies. You always get yourself into trouble because you don't remember the lies you've already told people. Liars need good memories, man.
See also: good, liar, memory, need

the devil is a liar

Used as a harsh repudiation of some statement, stance, or opinion as being a lie or deception. I was told I would never make it in this industry, but the devil is a liar! A: "Tom here says you were the one who took the money." B: "The devil is a liar! I never touched that money, and he knows it!
See also: devil, liar
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

liar is not believed (even) when he tells the truth

Prov. If people think that you are a liar, they will not believe anything you say. As it turned out, Fred was right when he warned his friends that the police were planning to raid their party; but they paid no attention to him, since they knew him to be a liar, and a liar is not believed even when he tells the truth.
See also: believe, he, liar, not, tell, truth
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

barefaced lie/liar

A shamelessly bold untruth/prevaricator. Bare here means bold-faced or brazen, but one writer speculates that barefaced, which dates from the late sixteenth century, originally meant “beardless,” a condition perhaps considered audacious in all but the youngest men. In any event, by the late seventeenth century it also meant bold and became attached to lie in succeeding years. See also naked truth.
See also: barefaced, liar, lie

liar, liar, pants on fire

A schoolyard taunt to someone suspected of prevaricating. It also is used by adults, although not usually in a serious sense. However, former New York mayor Edward I. Koch, berating politicians who failed to sign on to remake the state’s ineffective government, said, “You’re either on the side of the angels, or you’re a bum. And if the angels betray their pledges, I’m going to run around the state screaming, ‘Liar, liar, pants on fire!’” (New York Times, August 8, 2010). And a cartoon by Mike Luckovich shows one character with flames on his pants, saying “The evidence is overwhelming, global warming’s real . . .” while the other replies, “Liar, liar, pants on fire” (Boston Globe, July 23, 2010).
See also: fire, on, pant
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
In reality you cannot easily spot a liar. The human mind is complex and some liars are better than others, but if we can catch those tell tale signs we might just be able to catch a lie in progress...maybe even listen anyway just to watch the struggle.
How I know goes back to the dawn of human history: In evolutionary terms, being a successful liar constituted what anthropologists call "a selective advantage." That simply means the better liar you were back in the Stone Age, the better your survival chances.
We first analyzed the 10 behavioral stereotypes of liars without considering participant nationality.
Yesterday she added: "A lie is a lie and a liar is a liar..
If that is your opinion, that all are liars, then I think that you are mistaken, in error, and lots and lots of people confuse the two, between someone being mistaken, which is very human, and someone deliberately lying, which you are right to condemn.
On the other hand, liars use the front of the brain, a region that is involved in emotional responses.
I'm just about to play with the Liars, the last thing I need to do is break my wrist before we go on tour and record the new album.
And yet gaze aversion, like other commonly held stereotypes about liars, isn't correlated with lying at all, studies have shown.
Pants on Fire Radio 4, 3.45pmThe true history of lies, written and presented by Martin Plimmer, who explains that you can't tell a liar by the length of their nose, posture or whether their eyes are too close together -they look just like you and me.
Liars, for the most part, do not emphasize with nonverbals.
We asked you to text in and tell us whether women are bigger liars than men.
1984) (reversal required where plaintiffs closing argument characterized defendants as "despicable" and asserted that both they and their lawyers were "liars").
Now he's helping with this year's Liars' Convention - part of the four-day Feile Camlough - and thousands are expected to turn up, he claims.
The truth is, liars often provide a variety of verbal and nonverbal clues that signal their deception--and it's still hard to catch them at it.
Scott Fitzgerald, and Dostoyevsky are but a few of the great authors who have used lies and liars as keys to their writing.