let them eat cake


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let them eat cake

From the French qu'ils mangent de la brioche, literally meaning, "let them eat brioche" (a cake-like bread enriched with butter and eggs). The phrase is commonly misattributed to Marie Antoinette during one of the France's famines in the 18th century, though in reality it is ascribed to an unnamed princess in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Confessions in 1765, supposedly in response to being told that the peasants had no bread to eat. In current use, it can be a flippant response to being asked how some group will deal with being treated less fairly. A: "How are workers supposed to survive on minimum wage when every single dollar of it is going toward their rent?" B: "What do I care? Let them eat cake!"
See also: cake, eat, let

Let them eat cake.

Prov. A joking disclaimer of responsibility for some group of people. (Supposed to have been said by Marie Antoinette when she heard that the common people had no bread.) Fred: The budget will allow each one of our managers to get a substantial holiday bonus. Jane: And what about the rest of the employees? Fred: Let them eat cake!
See also: cake, eat, let
References in periodicals archive ?
The court was told he had shouted, "Let them eat cake, they said, but we won't eat cake.
Chances are she may have stumbled on Marie Antoinette's infamous quote " Let them eat cake", which was reportedly said when she heard there wasn't enough bread for peasants to eat.
Jeannie B Let them eat cake If a cup of tea at Haydock (Chatroom, yesterday) is dearer than half a bitter then just drink bitter!
CLEAN START It's time to take a fresh look at new homes FREE RANGEBarn doors open for visitors ISSUE 144 FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 11 2009 BEAUCASTLE A fairytale home inspired by Ruskin E D G B A S T O N H A R B O R N E H E R E F O R D S H I R E S TA F F O R D S H I R E S O L I H U L L TOURBRIDGEWORCESTERSHIRE FREE INSIDE 2 MAGAZINES headfffsdfsfsfsf headfffsdfsfsfsf headfffsdfsfsfsf Let them eat cake h ad head
"Even the lowest income households participate actively in the home fragrance market," says marketing consultant Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing, in her book Let Them Eat Cake: Marketing Luxury to the Masses as well as the Classes.
In the midst of all the chaos sits Michael Pollan, calmly nibbling a piece of homemade boar prosciutto and ruminating, "Let them eat cake made with unbleached organic flour and fresh butter from the local creamery." Pollan is the author of The Omnivore's Dilemma, an irritatingly excellent book.
It's claimed that when Marie Antoinette was told that her starving subjects were too poor to buy bread, she said, "Let them eat cake." And although she disavows the statement in Sofia Coppola's new candy-colored fantasy, one look at the desserts this queen (Kirsten Dunst) gets to sample will show you that she's clueless enough to have said it.
And of course the night couldn't come to an end without the big question: Did Marie say "Let them eat cake"?
"As a product category, tabletop products can be seen as both necessity; i.e., things people need and that serve a practical function, and luxury; i.e., things that people desire and that deliver an emotional boost," explains Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing and author of Let Them Eat Cake: Marketing Luxury to the Masses--as Well as the Classes.
Let them eat cake; marketing luxury to the masses; as well as the classes.
The "Let Them Eat Cake" Online Sweepstakes is tied to the World Premiere on The History Channel of The French Revolution, which offers viewers "an unprecedented look inside the fascinating details surrounding the revolution that changed the French monarchy, and planted the seeds for modern politics, diplomacy and nationalism." The sweepstakes also supports the launch of Baskin-Robbins' ice cream Cake Treats line, hence the content's title.
Danziger will launch her latest book, "Let them eat cake: marketing luxury to the masses-as well as the classes" in January.
LET THEM EAT CAKE. The PTA usually serves treats, but just in case, encourage it.
They include a few famous myths such as Marie Antoinette's having said, 'let them eat cake' (which she did not say) but not, alas, King Alfred's cakes.
and her purported callous "let them eat cake" statement, which story, Fraser points out, was first told about the Spanish princess who married Louis IV some 100 years earlier.