Lenten fare

Lenten fare

1. Literally, food that does not contain meat and may therefore be served during the Christian observance of Lent. Mom is serving our usual Lenten fare of battered cod and boiled potatoes again tonight.
2. By extension, meager meals or rations, especially those that contain no meat. The stranded sailor survived for nearly three months on a Lenten fare of wild vegetables and fish caught with a rudimentary net.
See also: fare

Lenten fare

meagre rations that do not include meat.
Lenten fare is literally food appropriate to Lent , the Christian season of fasting between Ash Wednesday and Easter Saturday in commemoration of Jesus's forty days of fasting in the wilderness.
See also: fare
References in periodicals archive ?
Prawns are also popular Lenten fare along with cream dory, bangus and tilapia.
Parliament, for one, where of late there has been an unseemly muddle about meatballs; to wit, opposition MPs who arrived at the members' dining room to find that the Government group had pre-ordered all the kyufteta, and all that was left was Lenten fare.
Turner says that borage, with leeks and onions, was traditional Lenten fare for the poor people of Northumberland.
In Greece, tarama, a preserved roe, was the Lenten fare of the poor.
But Lent is still very much with us in the heritage of dishes once solely Lenten fare but now year-round classics of regional cuisines.