Simon Legree

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Simon Legree

(ˈsɑɪmən ləˈgri)
n. a very hard taskmaster; a hard boss. (From the name of the slave driver in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.) Ask Simon Legree if I will be able to stop work and go home for breakfast now.
See also: Simon
References in periodicals archive ?
In Uncle Tom's Cabin, the most brutal of the slave owners, Simon Legree, hails from Vermont, as does Augustine St.
In handling their slaves, plantation mistresses could be as mean-spirited as the most vicious Simon Legree.
In Chapter XXXI upon finding Tom's Methodist hymnal, Legree proclaims that no "bawling, praying, singing niggers" would be tolerated on the Red River Plantation.
In contrast to the works of O'Dwyer and Legree, this study steps out of the cloister--to use Mark McGowan's phrase (8)--and tries to engage religion in a broader societal role to unpack early-twentieth century culture in a small Ontario community.
Much of the novel and play deal with the effects of slavery on both the blacks and whites, but the main plot concerns Tom's being sold to the stern and cruel master, Simon Legree, and Little Eva's love for him.
Larry LeGree, Mesa Verde's commanding officer, who also served with Marines during an individual augmentee assignment in Afghanistan.
As Dennis wound down, he thrust his right arm forward in a "get out" gesture, much in the manner of Simon Legree casting Little Nell out into a snowstorm.
The movie leaves viewers with the impression that slaveowners were devoted to their slaves, and while not all slaveowners were like Simon Legree, there is a whiff of the fanciful in Scarlett's devotion.
When Simon Legree rounds up his posse to pursue Cassy and Emmeline later in the book, that posse consists of "overseers of plantations" and "some of Legree's associates at the tavern-bar of a neighboring city" (418).
Paired with this was the character of George (actually Harry) Harris, son of George and Eliza in Uncle Tom's Cabin, who, again with a cynical irony cast toward the source novel, receives a Harvard education but cannot find a job because in a post-war racist North no one will hire him--except for Legree.
The poor look up at the working stiff of a foreman and see the hated Simon Legree.
Stowe contrasts these priestly Christian women with Simon Legree who sadistically consumes, rather than nurtures, his slaves.
Fagin and Bill Sykes and Simon Legree are vanishing types.
The metaphor of Sutpen as the "lash," the Simon Legree of the symbolic order, is framed in the text between the two clearest examples of his domination of the semiotic "other": Rosa's description of the slave fight and the story Sutpen later tells of his suppression of the slave revolt in the West Indies.