bury the lead

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bury the lead

In journalism, to open a news article with secondary or superfluous information, thus relegating the central premise (the lead, which usually occupies this position) to a later part. "Lead" in this sense is sometimes written as "lede." I usually just skim through articles in the newspaper, so it really annoys me when they bury the lead.
See also: bury, lead
References in periodicals archive ?
Ledes work when they telegraph information, arouse an appetite for what's coming, and set an engaging tone.
I like lede because it's not confusible with noun LEAD, not even for a moment.
These words of advice would have helped an area freelancer do a more professional job on her published piece called "The Art of Building Walls." Her lede:
Also at paper's site in "The Lede" blog are tributes from two of Hassan's other colleagues.
Once again, The New York Times' blog, The Lede, came up with much of interest, including quoting from Ian MacFarlane, a former classmate of the killer, who now works for AOL.
On its blog The Lede tonight -- where it has been breaking news all the week -- The New York Times passes along a tip from Virginia Tech professor, Paul Harrill.
The New York Times, for example, carried a top story on its site by the Associated Press, then by staff reporters, that changed slowly -- while it directed readers to its The Lede blog which had frequent entries.
But aren't we burying the lede? Isn't the real story that the speaker of the Texas House of Representatives is a pro-choice Jewish Republican?
It also changed the lede to: "A truck bomb that combined explosives with chlorine gas exploded in Baghdad on Wednesday, and officials said it may represent a new and deadly tactic by insurgents against Iraqi civilians.
We run it soon after the lede to help pull you through the story.
The effortlessly Kiana Lede Brown is not new to the entertainment scene.
@macwrites; This is an interesting and valuable read for theatre artists, so I don't want to bury the lede. But the mention of the director whose only contribution to an onstage sex scene was to yell "Rolling heat!" at the actors just about killed me.