apothecary's Latin

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apothecary's Latin

obsolete Latin that has been badly mangled or jumbled, either unintentionally through bad translation or intentionally for the sake of humor. Also known as Law Latin, Dog Latin, or Bog Latin. He only spent a year learning Latin, so now he just mutters apothecary's Latin to sound more learned than he is.
References in classic literature ?
There were our Mohammedan servants, a Latin monk, two
If Latin monks and Arabs cried, I know to a moral certainty that the horses cried also, and so the picture is complete.
They knew more about Latin and Greek when they left school, but they seemed to know less about life and its conditions as they would meet it at their homes.
Olney paused for effect, then added, "And what they didn't tell us was that every gentleman should have studied Latin, but that no gentleman should know Latin.
The only men who know their Latin are the apothecaries, the lawyers, and the Latin professors.
He knows more now about the world, and life, and man's place, and all the rest, than Arthur, or Norman, or I, or you, too, for that matter, and in spite of all our Latin, and French, and Saxon, and culture.
Well, tra la, and if you tackle Latin, Martin, I won't have any respect for you.
girls' Latin don't amount to much anyway," was the grateful reply.
echoed Polly; and then they heard each other recite till both were perfect "That 's pretty good fun," said Tom, joyfully, tossing poor Harkness away, and feeling that the pleasant excitement of companionship could lend a charm even to Latin Grammar.
You may have another go at it any, time you like," generously remarked Tom, as he shied the algebra after the Latin Reader.
Lorenzo Valla, one of the most famous promoters of Italian learning, not only translated into Latin the Iliad of Homer and the Histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, but also the Fables of Aesop.
It also contained the Latin versions of the same fables by Phaedrus, Avienus, and other authors.
He had not been there a fortnight before it was evident to him that life, complicated not only with the Latin grammar but with a new standard of English pronunciation, was a very difficult business, made all the more obscure by a thick mist of bash fulness.
It was on this ground that he was severe with Tom about his lessons; he was clearly a boy whose powers would never be developed through the medium of the Latin grammar, without the application of some sternness.
At present, in relation to this demand that he should learn Latin declensions and conjugations, Tom was in a state of as blank unimaginativeness concerning the cause and tendency of his sufferings, as if he had been an innocent shrewmouse imprisoned in the split trunk of an ash-tree in order to cure lameness in cattle.