language

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Related to Languages: Languages of the World

body language

Any gesture, posture, or movement of the body or face to nonverbally communicate emotions, information, or emphasis. His voice was calm and steady, but his body language was quite hostile and threatening. Many US presidents develop signature body language that one can easily recognize when they are speaking in public.
See also: body, language

loaded language

Words that are used in an attempt to sway someone, often by appealing to their emotions. Once you're able to recognize loaded language, you'll be far less likely to be fooled by commercials and politicians.
See also: language, loaded

private language

1. A way of communicating that is shared between and understood by only a few people. My sister and I have had our own private language ever since we were girls—our brothers still can't understand it! After working together for so many years, Ellen and I have a private language that is all our own.
2. philosophy A type of inner language only comprehensible to a single person. The concept was introduced by Ludwig Wittgenstein, who argued that it could not exist. The concept of private language is still a topic of debate among philosophers, especially due to its potential ramifications for metaphysics.
See also: language, private

artificial language

A language devised for a specific purpose, such as computer programming. We need to develop an artificial language for this coding project.
See also: language

speak the same language

To share and/or understand one another's opinions, values, beliefs, tastes, etc. Likened to literally speaking the same language as another person and therefore being able to communicate fluently. A: "I say we stop here and get some ice cream." B: "You and I are speaking the same language." Bill and my dad are getting along very well together. They're both obsessed with hockey, so they speak the same language.
See also: language, same, speak

mind (one's) language

To speak in a calm and polite manner; to not speak in a rude, hostile, or inflammatory manner. You mind your language, young lady, or you'll be grounded for the weekend! We've been trying to mind our language around the kids. They're at the age now where they'll start repeating everything we say!
See also: language, mind

watch (one's) language

To speak in a calm and polite manner; to not speak in a rude, hostile, or inflammatory manner. You watch your language, young lady, or you'll be grounded for the weekend! We've been trying to watch our language around the kids. They're at the age now where they'll start repeating everything we say!
See also: language, watch

*in plain language

 and *in plain English
Fig. in simple, clear, and straightforward language. (*Typically: be ~; put something [into] ~; say something ~; write something ~.) That's too confusing. Please say it again in plain English. Tell me again in plain language.
See also: language, plain

language that would fry bacon

Rur. profanity; swearing; curse words. ("Hot" language.) He carried on in language that would fry bacon. I was shocked when I heard that sweet little girl use language that would fry bacon.
See also: bacon, fry, language, that

speak someone's language

Fig. to say something that one agrees with or understands. I gotcha. Now you're speaking my language. Mary speaks Fred's language. They get along fine.
See also: language, speak

speak the same language

 
1. Lit. [for two or more people] to communicate in a shared language. These two people don't speak the same language and need an interpreter.
2. Fig. [for people] to have similar ideas, tastes, etc. Jane and Jack get along very well. They really speak the same language about almost everything. Bob and his father didn't speak the same language when it comes to politics.
See also: language, same, speak

use foul language

Euph. to swear. There's no need to use foul language. When she gets angry, she tends to use foul language.
See also: foul, language, use

use strong language

Euph. to swear, threaten, or use abusive language. I wish you wouldn't use strong language in front of the children. If you feel that you have to use strong language with the manager, perhaps you had better let me do the talking.
See also: language, strong, use

Watch your mouth!

 and Watch your tongue! Watch your language!
Inf. Pay attention to what you are saying!; Do not say anything rude! Hey, don't talk that way! Watch your mouth! Watch your tongue, garbage mouth!
See also: watch

speak the same language

Understand one another very well, agree with each other, as in Negotiations went on for days, but finally both sides realized they weren't speaking the same language . This term, alluding to literal understanding of spoken words, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: language, same, speak

speak the same language

If people speak the same language, they have the same views about things or want to achieve the same things. Like Castle, Wilson had been brought up in a similar way, and they spoke the same language. We have to make sure that the seller and the customer are both speaking the same language.
See also: language, same, speak

speak the same language

understand one another as a result of shared opinions and values.
1990 New Age Journal I translate between Greenpeace-speak and record industry-speak, because the two groups just don't speak the same language.
See also: language, same, speak

mind/watch your ˈlanguage

be careful about what you say in order not to upset or offend somebody: Watch your language, young man!
See also: language, mind, watch

speak/talk the same/a different ˈlanguage

share/not share ideas, experiences, opinions, etc., that make real communication or understanding possible: Unions and managers are at last beginning to speak the same language.Artists and scientists simply talk a different language.

speak someone’s language

tv. to say something that one agrees with or understands. I gotcha. Now you’re speaking my language.
See also: language, speak

Watch your mouth!

and Watch your tongue!
exclam. Pay attention to what you are saying!; Do not say anything rude! Hey, don’t talk that way! Watch your mouth! Listen, potty-mouth! Watch your tongue!
See also: watch
References in classic literature ?
I myself speak the language of the Munchkins, which is also the language of the Emerald City.
So the Scarecrow commanded the Soldier with the Green Whiskers to search among his people until he found one who understood the language of the Gillikins as well as the language of the Emerald City, and to bring that person to him at once.
In language there is no direct way of designating one of the ultimate brief existents that go to make up the collections we call things or persons.
We will consider next the question what is implied by saying that a person "understands" a word, in the sense in which one understands a word in one's own language, but not in a language of which one is ignorant.
He said the old man didn't talk Greek right, and he couldn't stand listening to him teach the language wrong.
Surely there is not another language that is so slipshod and systemless, and so slippery and elusive to the grasp.
Think of the ragged poverty of a language which has to make one word do the work of six--and a poor little weak thing of only three letters at that.
Then Britain became Angleland or England, and the language was no longer Celtic, but English.
Indeed, there is hardly the professor in our colleges, who, if he has mastered the difficulties of the language, has proportionally mastered the difficulties of the wit and poetry of a Greek poet, and has any sympathy to impart to the alert and heroic reader; and as for the sacred Scriptures, or Bibles of mankind, who in this town can tell me even their titles?
As to their language, it is quite incomprehensible.
In language and literature the most general immediate result of the Conquest was to make of England a trilingual country, where Latin, French, and Anglo-Saxon were spoken separately side by side.
I walked about on the table as the girl commanded; she asked me questions, as far as she knew my understanding of the language reached, and I answered them as loud as I could.
Now, an anchor is never cast, and to take a liberty with technical language is a crime against the clearness, precision, and beauty of perfected speech.
But if the task were, not to write off the English Bible, but to learn a language utterly unlike all other tongues, a language which hitherto had never been learned, except by the Indians themselves, from their mothers' lips,--a language never written, and the strange words of which seemed inexpressible by letters,--if the task were, first to learn this new variety of speech, and then to translate the Bible into it, and to do it so carefully that not one idea throughout the holy book should be changed,--what would induce you to undertake this toil?
I marvel, worthy Cedric,'' said the Abbot, as their discourse proceeded, ``that, great as your predilection is for your own manly language, you do not receive the Norman-French into your favour, so far at least as the mystery of wood-craft and hunting is concerned.
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