landing

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Related to Landings: Moon landings

dead-stick landing

The landing of an air or space craft without power (i.e., one whose control stick is "dead"). (Also written as "deadstick landing.") After the storm knocked out both of the plane's engines, the pilot was forced to performed a harrowing dead-stick landing.
See also: landing

happy landings

1. noun Safe arrivals, especially by airplane. They are one of the safest airports in the world, with a sterling record of happy landings.
2. expression A phrase expressing well-wishes for someone who is about to travel by plane. Happy landings, my darling. Call me when you get to Florida.
See also: happy, landing

land (one) in the doghouse

slang To cause one to be in great disfavor (with someone else) as a result of one's misdeeds or blunders. If I come home late from work again this week, it's really going to land me in the doghouse with my wife.
See also: doghouse, land

land (something)

To successfully acquire something, such as a job or piece of information. The economy is still in terrible shape—I haven't been able to land a job for months. Tom landed a really juicy story about the senator's ex-wife.
See also: land

land a blow

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single blow.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of blows by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: blow, land

land a punch

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single punch.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of punches by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: land, punch

land a/the knockout blow

1. In boxing and similar sports, to strike someone with a blow that renders them unconscious or technically disqualifies them from continuing. The newcomer landed the knockout blow in the first 30 seconds of the second round. She was behind for nearly the whole match, but she landed an incredible knockout blow that laid her opponent out flat.
2. By extension, to do something that completely and decisively ensures the defeat or downfall of someone or something. The Supreme Court's decision landed a knockout blow to our hopes of overturning the legislation. Their company was already struggling to survive, but the arrival of a new big-box retailer next door landed the knockout blow.
See also: blow, knockout, land

land a/the knockout punch

1. In boxing and similar sports, to strike someone with a blow that renders them unconscious or technically disqualifies them from continuing. The newcomer landed the knockout punch in the first 30 seconds of the second round. She was behind for nearly the whole match, but she landed an incredible knockout punch that laid her opponent out flat.
2. By extension, to do something that completely and decisively ensures the defeat or downfall of someone or something. The Supreme Court's decision landed a knockout punch to our hopes of overturning the legislation. Their company was already struggling to survive, but the arrival of a new big-box retailer next door landed the knockout punch.
See also: knockout, land, punch

land at

1. To come to rest or port some place in a ship or plane. Due to choppy conditions in the harbor, we had to wait for nearly four hours before we could land at shore. We ended up having to land at Minnesota 30 minutes into the flight because there was a leak in our fuel tank.
2. To bring an air or sea vessel to rest or port some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "land" and "at." I'm trying to land the boat at the pier, but the current is too strong at the moment. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be landing the plane at Dublin airport shortly.
See also: land

land in (one's) lap

To be gained or received unexpectedly or without effort. I didn't steal the internship from you—it landed in my lap, I swear! Your aunt has decided to get a new car, so her old one might land in your lap.
See also: land, lap

land in (something or some place)

1. To descend from the air and set down in some place or thing. The plane was forced to land in Atlanta due to a problem with its fuel tank. The wasp landed right in the bowl of pudding.
2. Of an aircraft, to perform a landing in the midst of certain weather conditions (e.g., fog, rain, snow, etc.). I don't know how you expect to land in fog as thick as this! The helicopter was forced to land in gale-force winds.
3. To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, dangerous, undesirable, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land

land in on

To appear at someone's house or place of work and become a burden for them, especially suddenly or without prior notice. Sorry for landing in on you like this just before dinner! We were in the area, so we thought we would pop by for a visit. The health inspector landed in on us right when the dinner rush was about to begin.
See also: land, on

land on (one)

1. Literally, to descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on me, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again.
2. To become the burden or responsibility of someone, especially very suddenly, unceremoniously, or without prior notice. It always lands on me to deal with the boss's stupid mistakes. Blame for their loss has to land on the team's coaching staff.
See also: land, on

land on (something)

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed on Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, on

land on both feet

To come through or survive a tough or uncertain situation successfully or gracefully. I wouldn't worry about Chloe—no matter what bizarre scheme she gets mixed up in, she always lands on both feet. I know you're stressed out about being laid off, but you are so skilled that I know you'll land on both feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on

land the first punch

1. Literally, to strike an opponent first. A: "Who landed the first punch?" B: "Tom, but Ben came back swinging. It's a real fight now!" I swung and missed, so the bully ended up landing the first punch—a direct hit to the nose.
2. To initiate a preemptive verbal attack, accusation, allegation, etc., in order to undermine someone or their agenda. We know they have dirt on us, so our campaign has to get out there and land the first punch in the media.
3. To score the first points in a game. That team is the lowest seed in the playoffs, so I'm shocked that they were able to land the first punch tonight.
See also: first, land, punch

land up (some place)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular location, especially unexpectedly. Typically followed by "in." In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. We somehow landed up at Mary's house last night around 3 AM. The bag was put on the wrong flight and landed up in Detroit. I took a wrong turn and landed up miles away from the campsite.
See also: land, up

land up at (some place)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular location, especially unexpectedly. We somehow landed up at Mary's house last night around 3 AM. I didn't know what to expect as I landed up at the hotel. Sorry for the long-winded story, but that's how I landed up at Harvard instead of Cornell.
See also: land, up

land up in (something)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, undesirable, dangerous, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land up in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us up in prison.
See also: land, up

land upon

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. ("Upon" is a less common, more formal alternative to "on.") The wasp landed upon my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed upon Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, upon

landing strip

1. Literally, a long flat stretch of land used by winged aircraft to land after flight. The flight had to circle the airport for nearly 30 minutes as debris was cleared from the landing strip.
2. slang Pubic hair, especially a woman's, that has been shaved or waxed into a single vertical line directly above the vulva.
See also: landing, strip

stick the landing

1. In gymnastics, to land firmly and cleanly on one's feet after completing a flip, layout, or other such acrobatic move. If she had stuck the landing, she would have earned a much higher score—that stumble is going to cost her. Kerri Strug's ability to stick the landing after vaulting with a serious ankle injury made her an Olympic legend.
2. To land firmly and cleanly on one's feet after making a jump of some kind. I thought I could stick the landing if I jumped from the treehouse, but I ended up breaking my ankle. I couldn't believe it when the kid did a backflip off the wall and stuck the landing like it was nothing.
3. To manage to perform or accomplish something successfully and satisfying or impressive manner. It's incredibly difficult to stick the landing when writing a TV series finale. That's why most finales end up disappointing a lot of fans. The book begins exploring some really interesting concepts, but it doesn't really stick the landing with any of them.
See also: landing, stick
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

land a blow

 
1. Lit. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow. The boxer landed a blow to the face of his opponent.
2. Fig. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion. The point about justice landed a blow.
See also: blow, land

land at

 some place
1. [for a ship] to come to port at a place. The ship landed at the wharf and the passengers got off. We landed at the island's main city and waited for customs to clear us.
2. [for an airplane] to return to earth at an airport. We landed at O'Hare at noon. We were to land at Denver, but there was bad weather.
See also: land

land something at

some place to bring a boat, ship, or airplane to rest or to port at or near a place. The captain landed the boat at a small island in hopes of finding a place to make repairs. They had to land the plane at a small town because of a medical emergency.
See also: land

land (up)on both feet

 and land (up)on one's feet 
1. Lit. to end up on both feet after a jump, dive, etc. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) She jumped over the bicycle and landed upon both feet. Donna made the enormous leap and landed on her feet.
2. Fig. to come out of something well; to survive something satisfactorily. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) It was a rough period in his life, but when it was over he landed on both feet. At least, after it was over I landed on my feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

land a blow

1. tv. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow.
2. tv. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion.
See also: blow, land
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(1990) The evaluation and prediction of impact forces during landings. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 22(3), 370-377.
We had a safety briefing two hours before we landed and when we were told we would have to go into the brace position for landings a sigh went around the plane."
Gulf Bridge International (GBI), the Middle East's first privately-owned submarine cable operator, has completed the landing of its new cable at Vodafone Qatar's international cable landing station located north of Doha.
These procedures and techniques from the beginning of pilot training can be used for vertical landings in any helicopter.
European space firm Astrium has been commissioned by the German Aerospace Centre to conduct a study for the testing of future moon landings. The aim is to prove the technological feasibility of a soft and precise robotic landing on the moon.
THE Normandy Landings were the first operations of the Allied Powers' invasion of Normandy, also known as Operation Neptune and Operation Overlord, during World War II.
13 calling for Q400 operators to conduct visual safety inspections of left and right main landing gear systems and main gear retract actuators that have accumulated 8,000 or more landings or have been in service for more than four years.
From here visitors enter the four-storey interior that is effectively a single volume, with the four principal floor decks arranged on the half level, and generous interstitial landings sitting between.
It provides pilots a clear image of the runway to allow safe landings.
Cushman & Wakefield has been appointed exclusive leasing agent for the retail component of The Landings at HarborSide development in Perth Amboy, announced Ira Bloom, director of commercial leasing for Kushner Properties.
On 7 May an AH-1W and a UH-1N conducted the program's first shipboard landings, on board Bataan (LHD 5) off the Virginia Capes, below and bottom.
Their new estimate for the annual recreational landings for all species, not just the troubled ones, comes to 4 percent.
According to JAS, landing gear of the type in question is supposed to be replaced after 20,000 landings or 10 years of use.
His slender torso penetrated the seam deeper than most normal landings, while his head depressed the back mat in a normal fashion.
PRC landings were 1,228,638 t (44.2% of total ECS landings), 1,042,233 t (37.5%), 379,403 t (13.6%), and 131,476 t (4.7%), respectively, for these four provinces, and totalled 2,781,750 t in 1992.