kick back

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kick back

1. verb To recoil, as of a gun that has been fired. If you're not careful, that rifle will bruise your shoulder when it kicks back.
2. verb To relax, typically by reclining and/or engaging in a sedentary activity. Often used in the phrase "kick back and relax." After a long day of yardwork, I love to kick back and relax on a lawn chair with a tall glass of lemonade. I like going to the movies, but I prefer kicking back with a good book at home.
3. noun A percentage of a profit paid to someone who facilitated the profit, typically through illegal means, such as using a government position to ease restrictions on a business deal. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. The politician was receiving kickbacks for years, and now the full extent of his corruption has been revealed.
4. noun The recoil of a gun. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. Careful, that rifle's got a heck of a kickback.
See also: back, kick

kick something back (to someone or something)

to move something back to someone, something, or some place by kicking. I kicked the ball back to Walter. He kicked it to me, and I kicked it back.
See also: back, kick

kick back (at someone or something)

to kick at someone or something in revenge. She kicked at me, so I kicked back at her. If you kick me, I'll kick back.
See also: back, kick

kick back

 
1. Inf. to relax; to lean back and relax. (See also lie back.) I really like to kick back and relax. It's time to kick back and enjoy life.
2. . Inf. [for an addict] to return to an addiction or a habit, after having "kicked the habit." Lefty kicked back after only a few days of being clean. A lot of addicts kick back very soon.
See also: back, kick

kick back

1. Recoil unexpectedly and violently, as in This rifle kicks back a lot when you fire it. [Early 1800s]
2. Return stolen property to the owner, as in The pawnbroker kicked back the paintings to the gallery. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
3. Pay back a part of one's earnings, as in The workers were forced to kick back half their pay to the agent. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: back, kick

kick back

v.
1. To return something by kicking it: I'll roll the ball to you, and then you kick it back. The goalie kicked back the soccer ball.
2. To recoil unexpectedly and violently: Be careful with that power saw—if it kicks back, you could be badly injured. Hold the rifle tightly—otherwise it will kick back and bruise your shoulder.
3. To relax, especially by resting: I was too tired to work last night, so I just kicked back at home and watched TV.
4. Slang To pay someone in return for an illegal favor: The corrupt official kicked $1,000 back to the politicians who helped him get the grant money. If you can kick back some of your profits, I'll make sure you win that contract.
See also: back, kick

kick back

1. in. to relax (and enjoy something). I like to kick back and listen to a few tunes.
2. n. money received in return for a favor. (Usually kickback.) The kickback the cop got wasn’t enough, as it turned out.
3. in. [for an addict] to return to addiction after having been detoxified and withdrawn. (Drugs.) They may kick back a dozen times before it takes.
See also: back, kick
References in periodicals archive ?
The resulting stack of 10 classifiers was then applied to a test set of all the remaining data, which consisted of 55 kickbacks and nearly an hour of normal cutting.
The then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and several others were accused of receiving kickbacks from Bofors AB who were awarded the contract for the supply of 155 mm field howitzers.
According to the SEC's complaint, Norway-based Nycomed entered into nine contracts with Iraqi ministries involving the payment of approximately $750,000 in cash kickbacks between 2000 and 2002.
Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson paid millions of dollars in kickback payments, including disguised pay-offs, to nursing home pharmacy company Omnicare Inc to prescribe its drugs to patients, U.
Also, Omnicare regularly paid kickbacks to nursing homes by providing consultant pharmacist services at rates below the company's cost--and below fair market value for such, services--in order to induce the homes to refer their patients to Omnicare for pharmacy services, the government alleged.
The company said that an investigation has been launched into allegations that it was used to pay kickbacks by a South African company that did business in Iraq.
chemical company and its subsidiary, Naaman allegedly offered and paid 10 percent kickbacks to the then Iraqi government in exchange for five contracts under the OFFP.
A former General Motors Corp executive, now said to be living in St Kitts & Nevis, has been indicted in what federal prosecutors said was a kickback scheme involving bulk aluminum sales that cost the automaker about US$80 million, reports Reuters (March 15, 2008):
Attorney's Office agreed to drop three other charges relating to taking kickbacks from the medical supply companies Osteotech, Orthofix, Alphatec and Signus.
SANTA CLARITA -- Federal authorities are probing whistle-blowers' claims that a food buyer for Oregon's Department of Corrections took at least $475,000 in bribes and kickbacks from a Santa Clarita food wholesaler, according to court documents filed in U.
In October 2004, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer filed a civil action against Marsh & McLennan, charging it with bid rigging and accepting kickbacks from selected insurers for steering business to them.
A former Defense Department contracting official has been sentenced to 11 years in prison for taking kickbacks from a contractor.
The market and practices of the title insurance industry are worthy of further study following federal and state investigations identifying potentially illegal activities such as kickbacks, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office issued April 24.
FERROUS and non-ferrous metal companies paid together millions of dollars in kickbacks to the toppled Saddam Hussein regime, the Independent Inquiry Committee into the UN Iraq Oil for Food programme scandal has claimed.
RESPA became federal law in 1974 to provide consumers with advance disclosures of settlement charges and to prohibit kickbacks and excessive fees in the home buying process.