Don Juan

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Don Juan

A man who has a reputation for seducing many women. If you're going to date Mark, be careful. I heard he's a bit of a Don Juan.
See also: don
References in classic literature ?
But the worst of it, gentlemen- I am giving Kuragin away to you- is that that man suffers, and this Don Juan, wicked fellow, is taking advantage of it
At night we came to the house of Don Juan Fuentes, a rich landed proprietor, but not personally known to either of my companions.
I asked leave to look at it and read, `Don Juan Triumphant.
Juan Alvarado, the Federal commander, was a monster.
The three ships of war came together again at the island of Juan Fernandez, their appointed rendezvous, but waited in vain for the Isaac Todd.
In France, sire, -- at a small port, near Antibes, in the Gulf of Juan.
Florida, discovered on Palm Sunday, in 1512, by Juan Ponce de Leon, was originally named
As I was saying to you, Don Juan, I have the greatest difficulty in getting myself, I won't say understood, but simply believed.
Tapeworm had just walked off, enveloped in his cloak, with which his gigantic chasseur was always in attendance, and looking as much as possible like Don Juan.
Consider what you are saying, senor," said the youth; "this master of mine is not a knight, nor has he received any order of knighthood; for he is Juan Haldudo the Rich, of Quintanar.
And to behold him now, seeking small loans with plaintive condescension, sponging for breakfast on an art-student of nineteen, a fallen Don Juan who had neglected to die at the propitious hour, had a colour of romance for young imaginations.
In approaching this deserted mission-house from the south, the traveller passes over the mountain of San Juan, supposed to be the highest peak in the Californias.
How many a well-employed hour he passed with that hero on his isle of Juan Fernandez
Charles Lamb, with his infinite tact, attempting to, might have drawn charming pictures of the life of his day; Lord Byron in a stanza of Don Juan, aiming at the impossible, might have achieved the sublime; Oscar Wilde, heaping jewels of Ispahan upon brocades of Byzantium, might have created a troubling beauty.
It was quite cheering to meet the modern Don Juan once more.