Don Juan

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Don Juan

A man who has a reputation for seducing many women. If you're going to date Mark, be careful. I heard he's a bit of a Don Juan.
See also: don
References in classic literature ?
Lionel, it seems, was on his way to John Ferdinando, as he calls the modern Juan Fernandes.
I asked leave to look at it and read, `Don Juan Triumphant.
One day, however, as he was lying half asleep in the warm water somewhere off the Island of Juan Fernandez, he felt faint and lazy all over, just as human people do when the spring is in their legs, and he remembered the good firm beaches of Novastoshnah seven thousand miles away, the games his companions played, the smell of the seaweed, the seal roar, and the fighting.
Consider what you are saying, senor," said the youth; "this master of mine is not a knight, nor has he received any order of knighthood; for he is Juan Haldudo the Rich, of Quintanar.
And to behold him now, seeking small loans with plaintive condescension, sponging for breakfast on an art-student of nineteen, a fallen Don Juan who had neglected to die at the propitious hour, had a colour of romance for young imaginations.
In France, sire, -- at a small port, near Antibes, in the Gulf of Juan.
In approaching this deserted mission-house from the south, the traveller passes over the mountain of San Juan, supposed to be the highest peak in the Californias.
Early in August, a wandering band of savages from the Strait of Juan de Fuca made their appearance at the mouth of the Columbia, where they came to fish for sturgeon.
I don't profess to be a Don Juan or a gay Lothario,--that class of man, you know; but I do pretend to know something about the harder sex.
The movement of her eyes, their veiled gleam became mischievous when she asked, "And Don Juan Blunt, have you seen him over there?
He is a bit of a Don Juan, and you can imagine that for a man like him it is not a very difficult part to play in a quiet country district.
He went as near as his century permitted to walking the world literally like Don Juan, with rapier and guitar.
How many a well-employed hour he passed with that hero on his isle of Juan Fernandez
There was in it a touch of the combat of Don Juan and the statue.
Charles Lamb, with his infinite tact, attempting to, might have drawn charming pictures of the life of his day; Lord Byron in a stanza of Don Juan, aiming at the impossible, might have achieved the sublime; Oscar Wilde, heaping jewels of Ispahan upon brocades of Byzantium, might have created a troubling beauty.