Joe Six-Pack


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Joe Sixpack

An average man, typically of the working class. My brother's just your typical guy, a real Joe Sixpack—you can find him watching a sporting event in a bar after work pretty much any night of the week.
See also: joe, Sixpack

Joe Six-Pack

A name for an average, usually lower-middle-class, man, who enjoys drinking beer (which can be bought packages of six—hence "six pack"). Yeah, but those aren't the kinds of political issues that interest Joe Six-Pack, OK?
See also: joe

Joe Six-pack

A lower-middle-class male. For example, I don't think opera will appeal to Joe Six-pack; he'd prefer a rock concert. This disparaging term, first recorded in 1977, conjures up the image of a man in undershirt and construction helmet who will down all of a six-pack (six cans or bottles of beer sold in a package) in an evening.
See also: joe

Joe Six-pack

n. the average guy who sits around drinking beer by the six-pack. Joe Six-pack likes that kind of television program.
See also: joe

Joe Six-Pack

A working-class male. The six-pack in this somewhat derogatory name refers to a half-dozen bottles or cans of beer that are packaged together, to be bought as a unit, and supposedly a workingman’s beverage of choice. Six-pack came into use in the early 1950s, and Joe Six-Pack was first recorded in 1970 and quickly proliferated. Reporter Martin F. Nolan used it in an article about Joe Moakley’s political campaign against Louise Day Hicks for Congress: “Moakley plans to make Mrs. Hicks the major issue in the campaign, talking about issues in the media and shouting in Joe Six-Pack’s ear to wake up and face the unsimplistic facts of life (Boston Globe, August 28, 1970). The Globe headline was “After the Soul of Joe Six-Pack.” See also John Doe.
See also: joe
References in periodicals archive ?
This fall, Philadelphia Daily News beer columnist Don Russell (nicknamed "Joe Six-Pack") will celebrate the release of his second book, Christmas Beers: The Cheeriest, Tastiest and Most Unusual Holiday Brews (Universe, 2008).
What about Joe Six-Pack? Where do New York's red-blooded meat-and-potatoes men go for an old-fashioned skin show now that Rudy's closed down all the old sex clubs?
No one is really going to go out and rent a priest, Haggett said; the Rent a Priest name is a "marketing ploy." She said she is in the business of marketing other people's work, and she knows how to reach "Joe Six-pack."
"It's time that normal Joe Six-pack American is finally represented in the position of vice presidency, and I think that that's kind of taken some people off guard, and they're out of sorts, and they're ticked off about it, but it's motivation ...
Birnbaum deserves special commendation for suffering through such events as a press conference of the Coalition Against Regressive Taxation, a gang of brewers, distillers, cigarette makers, and trucking companies all bravely fighting excise taxes in the name of Joe Six-Pack.
"Don't have Joe six-pack paying for the abusers," Romain said.
Pennsylvania, he notes, isn't home to Joe Six-pack; it's Joe 18-Pounds who lives here.
Pat Higgins, president of the Wyoming Beer Distributors Association, said "Joe Six-Pack," the working man, is "the guy who's going to pay for it"
"It will put more tax on the common man, Joe Six-Pack," he said.
Yet, Joe Six-Pack still has to pay a tax on beer," English said.
"If Congress can repeal the estate tax for billionaires, then Congress can roll back the beer tax for Joe Six-Pack," said Kleczka, whose state is home to Miller Brewing.
It was not as if the Getty called in a dozen Joe Six-Packs from the street; no, it listened with anguish to people who had spent their professional lives learning to tell the difference between real and fake.
Well, now's the time to write your legislators, informing 'em that we don't need any more taxes on wine or spirits; apparently, beer would not get whacked with more taxes, as it's the "Joe Six-Packs" who'd bear the brunt of the sucker.
"There are 80 million 'Joe Six-packs' out there who drink beer, the beverage of moderation," said Heurich.