Joe Six-Pack

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Joe Six-Pack

slang An average person, especially a man and typically of the working class. A somewhat condescending allusion to the drinking preferences of the working class. My brother's just your typical guy, a real Joe Six-Pack—you can find him watching a sporting event in a bar after work pretty much any night of the week. If we let Joe Six-Pack decide the policies in our country, we'd still be stuck in the 1800s.
See also: joe
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Joe Six-pack

A lower-middle-class male. For example, I don't think opera will appeal to Joe Six-pack; he'd prefer a rock concert. This disparaging term, first recorded in 1977, conjures up the image of a man in undershirt and construction helmet who will down all of a six-pack (six cans or bottles of beer sold in a package) in an evening.
See also: joe
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Joe Six-pack

n. the average guy who sits around drinking beer by the six-pack. Joe Six-pack likes that kind of television program.
See also: joe
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Joe Six-Pack

A working-class male. The six-pack in this somewhat derogatory name refers to a half-dozen bottles or cans of beer that are packaged together, to be bought as a unit, and supposedly a workingman’s beverage of choice. Six-pack came into use in the early 1950s, and Joe Six-Pack was first recorded in 1970 and quickly proliferated. Reporter Martin F. Nolan used it in an article about Joe Moakley’s political campaign against Louise Day Hicks for Congress: “Moakley plans to make Mrs. Hicks the major issue in the campaign, talking about issues in the media and shouting in Joe Six-Pack’s ear to wake up and face the unsimplistic facts of life (Boston Globe, August 28, 1970). The Globe headline was “After the Soul of Joe Six-Pack.” See also John Doe.
See also: joe
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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