Joe College

Joe College

The average, ordinary, or typical college or university student. (Though the term is gendered, it does not necessarily refer to a man.) You're interested in this stuff because you're a political science major, but Joe College doesn't care two figs about the stuff that happens in politics. It's funny to see my brother, who nearly dropped out of high school and spent so many years going against the grain, become Mr. Joe College all of a sudden.
See also: college, joe

Joe College

n. a typical or average male college student. Joe College never had a computer or a laser-powered record player in the good old days.
See also: college, joe

Joe College

A typical male college student. The phrase came on the scene in the 1930s, usually applied approvingly, but occasionally as a label for a student whom the academic life sheltered from having to hold down a “real job” in the “real world.”
See also: college, joe
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: "Chicago Heights: Little Joe College, the Outfit, and the Fall of Sam Giancana" is a riveting and true story of coming of age in the Chicago Mob.
To understand these subtleties, it's helpful to consider how students coped with anti-Semitism at Bucknell University in the early 1950s, as presented by novelist Philip Roth's "Joe College" memoir account in the December 1987 issue of The Atlantic Monthly.
For the guy once known as Joe College, it's been a bitter dose of reality at times.
JOE COLLEGE. Danny is torn between his life as a Yale junior and his spring break job on his father's lunch truck, "The Roach Coach."
"Do you remember the picture of Betty Co-Ed and Joe College trimming the tree on the cover of the December 1932 Sunset?"
"Joe College" appeared in the very first issue of Esquire, and every autumn Esquire magazine ran a feature entitled "Going Back to School" (pg.
His depictions of Betty Coed, the prototypical "flapper" (along with her gentleman friend, Joe College), became the quintessential definition of the decade's "flaming youth."
Yes sir, I'll come over immediately." When he hung up the phone, Joe College apologized for the interruption.
Yet the UO logo does have a certain hokiness; with its block letters it looks like something that belongs on Joe College's freshman beanie.