job

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job

1. n. a drunkard. Give the job a drink and make somebody happy today.
2. n. a theft; a criminal act. (see also pull a job.) Who did that job at the old mansion last week?
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References in periodicals archive ?
The actual number of offshoring jobs lost may seem insignificant compared to the overall size of the U.
Alternatively, for far less money, camps can advertise open positions online, year-round, through regional job Web sites and reach a more targeted audience
The American Hospital Association's career center which provides access to more than 4 million resumes and 300,000 industry jobs nationwide via career builder.
He says the dollars a firm spends to help employees find new jobs are minimal when compared with the threat of an age-discrimination lawsuit by an angry manager.
finds jobs in the "hidden" market before they're announced to the world, thus reducing the competitive rush of resumes and the inevitable comparisons with hordes of others.
Job seekers rarely fail because there are no job opportunities, they fail because they don't effectively contact and follow up with the people who can lead them to jobs.
Nor does he devote much attention to the aftermath of layoffs: the challenge of creating new jobs that provide good pay, benefits, and opportunities.
Tourism accounted for 512,600 jobs last year across the five-county area.
Research by the McKinsey Global Institute suggests that, given the fight competitive environment, local services across the range can be a powerful source of wealth creation and jobs for middle-income economies, more powerful than offshore services could ever be.
They get lost in the shuffle of resumes, or worse, don't bother to apply because of the tremendous number of lower-end jobs that they have to search through.
Even low-wage jobs might serve as a deterrent for some returning home from prison.
Employers prefer to have trustworthy information about prospective employees, which leads them to rely on contacts who can serve as references for prospective employees, especially for white-collar jobs (Granovetter, 1974).
Is this going to be a complete rethinking of the jobs within your organization or is it going to be for a few of the staff?
Alternate phrases are proposed to reflect that "job placement" requires active choice by individuals with disabilities and that the ultimate choice of working or not belongs to individuals with disabilities, no matter what jobs the counselor or rehabilitation professional may arrange for them.