job

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job

1. n. a drunkard. Give the job a drink and make somebody happy today.
2. n. a theft; a criminal act. (see also pull a job.) Who did that job at the old mansion last week?
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References in periodicals archive ?
Relative to that benchmark, and Forrester's estimated 3 million jobs set to be offshored over the next 10 years, Slaughter calculates: annualizing that 3 million means about 300,000 jobs per year, totaling about 1 percent of the total gross destruction that is going on in the U.S.
First impressions also apply to perceptions of an organization, the ambience of a workplace, and even the value of a job position.
Alternatively, for far less money, camps can advertise open positions online, year-round, through regional job Web sites and reach a more targeted audience!
This report highlights the 25 Best Jobs based on each job's overall Glassdoor Job Score.1 The Glassdoor Job Score is determined by weighting three key factors equally: earning potential based on median annual base salary, job satisfaction rating and number of job openings.
Texas added the most construction jobs during the past year (56,100 jobs, 7.9 percent).
The new feature is built directly into Google Search to provide a comprehensive listing of jobs across the web.
The relatively large sample size allows employee jobs by geography and industry to be produced.
The message on the site says it's "a complete resource site for those seeking medical assistant jobs, with hundreds of job listings, as well as, resume and interviewing tips.” In addition to providing job openings, the website covers a variety of job-hunting topics, such as advice on job search strategies and tactics, cover letter writing, resume construction and interviewing skills.
Contrary to some reports, .jobs will not comprise millions of job boards, but rather one dynamic platform serving only relevant jobs to the job seeker community.
Job seekers rarely fail because there are no job opportunities, they fail because they don't effectively contact and follow up with the people who can lead them to jobs.
Key to that strategy is the emergence of new "middle jobs," or jobs that can't be outsourced.
In 1996, he was the lead writer and reporter for a six-part Times series on "The Downsizing of America," which reported that more than 43 million jobs had been wiped out in the United States between 1979 and 1995.
"LaBranche's commitment to keep more than 500 jobs downtown for at least the next decade is the latest example of the financial industry's confidence in the future of Lower Manhattan," said Doctoroff.
Overall, track-mounted systems provide quick setup and a low-profile, cost-effective solution for efficiently managing small and large recycling jobs profitably.
Local services account for more than 60 percent of all jobs in middle income and developed economies, and virtually all of new job creation (Figure 1).