Jim Crow


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Related to Jim Crow: Jim Crow laws

Jim Crow

The period in the southern United States, from the end of the American Civil War until the 1960s, in which African Americans were treated as a lower class of citizens than white people. Though there are still race-related issues today, back during Jim Crow, a black person couldn't even use the same drinking fountain as a white person!
See also: crow, Jim
References in periodicals archive ?
We are the only Western nation founded on 246 years of African-American slavery, followed by 90 years of Jim Crow segregation -- near-slavery.
Although the use of illegal drugs by white people is equal to or higher than that among blacks, the disparity in incarceration rates goes to the heart of the new Jim Crow.
As a legally enforced social hierarchy predicated upon racial "knowledge," Jim Crow was a system that both precluded and produced intimacies--some realized through contact, others cultivated and lived solely in the realm of fantasy.
Ghosts of Jim Crow insightfully draws the broad plot lines of the American racial paradigm:
Jim Crow laws were ordinances passed after 1877 by Southern states in defiance of the 14th Amendment.
Washington, who grew up after emancipation but became active as writers as Jim Crow superseded the ideals of Reconstruction in the 1890s.
UPHEAVAL IN CHARLESTON: EARTHQUAKE AND MURDER ON THE EVE OF JIM CROW tells of a massive earthquake near Charleston South Carolina in 1886 that sent shock waves as far as Maine and Florida.
She considers the scope and impact of this current law enforcement, legal and penal activity to be comparable with that of the Jim Crow laws of the 19th and 20th centuries.
They escaped Adolf Hitler, only to encounter Jim Crow.
Her discussion of the 24th Infantry's Third Battalion's arrival in Houston to guard over the construction of a National Guard training camp and the town's reaction to the men who were "unwilling to keep in their place" is a vivid portrayal of the attitudes of African American soldiers who intended to defy the social system structured for them by the Jim Crow laws and of the attitudes of hostile, unwelcoming citizens who did not accept the well-traveled, well-seasoned soldiers.
We must not forget the millions disenfranchised by modern Jim Crow policies when we go the ballot box in November 2010.
Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class, and Black Community Development in the Jim Crow South.
In its pages, she systematically and credibly makes the case that the United States now has a system of racial oppression as stark, brutal, and comprehensive as Jim Crow was in its time: mass incarceration.
The personification of the Jim Crow segregation laws - a swirling, threatening black bird that "peck, peck, pecks" at their psyche - is a powerful image hovering over the pages.
Washington: Black Leadership in the Age of Jim Crow is an interpretive biography of Booker T.