Jane Roe


Also found in: Dictionary.

Jane Roe

The name given to a female whose real name is not known or cannot be revealed, as in legal proceedings. Have they reached a decision in the Jane Roe case yet?
See also: Jane, roe
References in periodicals archive ?
He, Worden and the Centra Villa property manager then went to the Zone 4 police department and filed a police report against Jane Doe and Jane Roe for identity theft.
In her biography The Story of Norma McCorvey--The Woman Who Became Jane Roe, she recalled her previous notion on the subject: "Abortion, to me, meant 'going back' to the condition of not being pregnant." She believed, and was told, that the baby growing inside of her was "just a piece of tissue." This belief changed with McCorvey's conversion to Christianity.
The pseudonymous Jane Roe, the only plaintiff found to have standing, was described by the Court as an unmarried, pregnant woman who wished to have an abortion but was unable to do so under Texas law, because her life was not threatened by the pregnancy and she could not afford to travel to a state with more liberal criminal abortion laws.
Last year, APHA signed onto a friend-of-the-court brief in the case of Jane Roe v.
Wade, 1973's landmark abortion case, brought "Jane Roe" out of the woodworks.
Those boldface dates are preceded by less prominent but nonetheless decisive times: 1516, when a Dominican named Johann Tetzel led the sale of indulgences that deeply angered Luther; and 1970, when a young Texas woman named Norma McCorvey (Jane Roe) filed suit to obtain an abortion.
Jane Roe was an unmarried pregnant woman, seeking to terminate an undesired pregnancy.
Some are famous, like Norma Mc-Corvey, aka Jane Roe, the woman pseudonymously named in the key 1973 Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in the U.S.
In Roe, for example, it might have looked for fact-specific grounds to strike down the Texas abortion statute that Jane Roe had challenged without going so far as to create a constitutional right to abortion.
The 1973 US Supreme Court case involving Norma McCorvey -known as Jane Roe for the purposes of the case -resulted in the decision that abortion was permissible under the American constitution.
Jane Roe was interviewed in person at her residence, 123 Main Street, Anytown, USA, on December 31, 2003.
Norma McCorvey, who sued under the pseudonym of Jane Roe, changed her
"It goes all the way back to Jane Roe," says Matthea Marquart, 27, the president of NOW-NYC.
Norma McCorvey ("Jane Roe") and Sandra Cano ("Mary Doe") filed their briefs in the case of Donna Santa Marie et al.
Jane Roe, of the Abortion Law Reform Society, said: "Tragically this has ended exactly how we feared it would.