Jane


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Related to Jane: dictionary

average Jane

An average, unexceptional, or ordinary girl or woman. Derived from the more common phrase "average Joe," which generally refers to a boy or man. What sets me apart from your average Jane, though, is my tenacity and ferocity in business. I'm as much a fan of the show as the average Jane, but I don't watch it religiously.
See also: average, Jane

Jane Roe

The name given to a female whose real name is not known or cannot be revealed, as in legal proceedings. Have they reached a decision in the Jane Roe case yet?
See also: Jane, roe

plain Jane

A female who is not considered physically attractive by societal standards. Betty always felt like she was a plain Jane, so she was very surprised when the most handsome boy in school asked her to be his prom date.
See also: Jane, plain

Jane Doe

A woman whose identity is unknown or being protected, as in legal proceedings. The victim is a Jane Doe—the paramedics didn't find any identification on her. The case was brought by a Jane Doe, so we don't know the true identity of the woman suing us.
See also: doe, Jane

John Doe

A man whose identity is unknown or being protected, as in legal proceedings. The victim is a John Doe—the paramedics didn't find any identification on him. The case was brought by a John Doe, so we don't know the true identity of the man suing us.
See also: doe, john

Mary Jane

slang Marijuana. Hey man, you know where we can score some Mary Jane around here? I only smoke Mary Jane on my own, because I get really paranoid around other people.
See also: Jane, Mary

John Doe

1. Also, John Q. Public; Joe Blow; Joe Doakes; Joe Zilch. An average undistinguished man; also, the average citizen. For example, This television show is just right for a John Doe, or It's up to John Q. Public to go to the polls and vote. Originally used from the 13th century on legal documents as an alias to protect a witness, John Doe acquired the sense of "ordinary person" in the 1800s. The variants date from the 1900s. Also see Joe six-pack.
2. Also, Jane Doe. An unknown individual, as in The police found a John Doe lying on the street last night, or The judge issued a warrant for the arrest of the perpetrators, Jane Doe no. 1 and Jane Doe no. 2 . [Second half of 1900s]
See also: doe, john

plain Jane

an unattractive girl or woman.
2002 Guardian [The film] assembles its stereotypes (the sexy exchange student, the plain Jane who's really a fox, the jock who is only dating her for a bet) then proceeds to gunk them all with a ton of scatalogical prankery.
See also: Jane, plain

a plain ˈJane

(disapproving) a girl or woman who is not very pretty or attractive: She was a shy girl, who always thought of herself as a plain Jane.
See also: Jane, plain

jane

1. n. marijuana. (Drugs.) Wilmer has jane coming out of his ears.
2. n. a women’s restroom; the ruth. (As a counter to john.) The jane is upstairs.

John Doe

and Jane Doe (ˈdʒɑn ˈdo)
n. a name used for a person whose real name is unknown. The tag on the corpse said Jane Doe, since no one had identified her. John Doe was the name at the bottom of the check.
See also: doe, john

Jane Doe

verb
See also: doe, Jane

Mary Jane

1. and Mary J. and Maryjane n. marijuana. (see also jane.) I can’t live another day without Mary Jane!
2. n. a plain-looking girl. She’s just a Mary Jane and will never be a glamour girl.
See also: Jane, Mary

John Doe

The average person. This appellation actually dates from the thirteenth century, when it was used in legal documents to disguise the identity of witnesses; the tenant plaintiff was called John Doe and the landlord defendant Richard Roe. In the nineteenth century the name acquired the present meaning of ordinary person. A book, The O’Hara Family (1825), included “Tales, Containing . . . John Doe,” and almost a century later a movie starring Gary Cooper was entitled Meet John Doe (1941). Similar appellations include Joe Blow, first recorded in 1867; Joe Doakes, from the 1920s; and John Q. Public, coined by the writer William Allen White in 1937. John Doe has outlived them all.
See also: doe, john
References in classic literature ?
Doing nothing, expecting nothing; merging night in day; feeling but the sensation of cold when I let the fire go out, of hunger when I forgot to eat: and then a ceaseless sorrow, and, at times, a very delirium of desire to behold my Jane again.
"Just one word, Jane: were there only ladies in the house where you have been?"
There were only two beds in the nursery now, Jane's and her nurse's; and there was no kennel, for Nana also had passed away.
Once a week Jane's nurse had her evening off; and then it was Wendy's part to put Jane to bed.
As Rokoff closed his appeal, awaiting the reply he invited, the look of surprise upon Jane Clayton's face turned to one of disgust.
Though Jane Clayton doubted the cook's ability to be of any material service to her, she was nevertheless deeply grateful to him for what he already had done.
"I never said you had no heart," protested Jane; "but I hate when you speak like a book."
My dear, silly old Jane! I shall miss you greatly."
He took Jane's clothes out of the chest of drawers in her bedroom, and he threw them out of the top- floor window.
"Would you like him for a husband?" asked Jane calmly.
Cole, and since she went away, I was reading it again to my mother, for it is such a pleasure to her a letter from Janethat she can never hear it often enough; so I knew it could not be far off, and here it is, only just under my huswifeand since you are so kind as to wish to hear what she says;but, first of all, I really must, in justice to Jane, apologise for her writing so short a letteronly two pages you see hardly twoand in general she fills the whole paper and crosses half.
Delamayn was the master of the house) Lady Jane returned to the charge.
A feeling of dreamy peacefulness stole over Jane as she sank down upon the grass where Tarzan had placed her, and as she looked up at his great figure towering above her, there was added a strange sense of perfect security.
Miss Bingley's civility to Elizabeth increased at last very rapidly, as well as her affection for Jane; and when they parted, after assuring the latter of the pleasure it would always give her to see her either at Longbourn or Netherfield, and embracing her most tenderly, she even shook hands with the former.
"I was helping Emma Jane choose aprons, and didn't think you'd mind which color I had.