jab

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big jab

slang A lethal injection of drugs, as administered to someone who has been sentenced to death. After the horrific crimes that guy's committed, he needs to get the big jab.
See also: big, jab

have a jab at (someone or something)

To make a teasing, sarcastic, or insulting remark, gibe, or criticism at someone's or something's expense. I'm really not trying to have a jab at you. I'm just trying to give you some constructive feedback. He's really nice to me when we hang out by ourselves, but he always starts having jabs at me when we're around his other friends. I can speak the language very well, but they still can't resist having a jab at my accent.
See also: have, jab

take a jab at (someone or something)

To make a mocking, sarcastic, insulting remark or criticism at someone's or something's expense. The senator continued taking jabs at his opponent's record throughout the debate. I'm really not trying to take a jab at you. I'm just trying to give you some constructive feedback. I can speak the language very well, but they still can't resist taking a jab at my accent.
See also: jab, take

jab at someone or something

to poke or punch at someone or something. Tom jabbed at Fred. Don't jab at the cat!
See also: jab

jab someone in something

to poke someone in a particular location on the body. Fred jabbed Tom in the side. He jabbed himself in the hand.
See also: jab

jab someone with something

to poke or stick someone with something. He jabbed Henry with the rake handle on purpose. The mugger jabbed the victim with a knife.
See also: jab

jab something at someone or something

to poke someone or something with something. Tom jabbed the stick at the dog. I jabbed my fist at Walter.
See also: jab

jab something into something

 and jab something in
to stab something into something. Billy jabbed his spoon into the gelatin. He jabbed in his spoon. He jabbed it in.
See also: jab

jab something out

to thrust something out. Molly jabbed her fist out suddenly. She jabbed out her fist.
See also: jab, out

take a dig at someone

 and take a jab at someone; take digs at someone
Fig. to insult or pester someone. Why did you take a jab at Sam? You're always taking digs at people who think they're your friends. Jane is always taking digs at Bob, but she never really means any harm.
See also: dig, take

take a jab at someone

 and take a punch at someone 
1. to hit at someone; to poke someone. Max took a jab at Lefty and missed. Lefty took a punch at Max.
2. Go to take a dig at someone.
See also: jab, take

big jab

n. a lethal injection used to carry out a death sentence. (Journalistic.) Nearly 59 prisoners got the big jab in Texas this year.
See also: big, jab

jab pop

(ˈdʒæbˈpɑp)
in. to inject (drugs). (Drugs.) Jab popping is a ticket to cement city.
See also: jab, pop

take a dig at someone

and take a jab at someone
tv. to insult or needle someone. You’re always taking digs at people who think they’re your friends. Jed took a jab at Tom about the way he was driving.
See also: dig, someone, take

take a jab at someone

verb
See also: jab, someone, take
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Jew, in Jabes, is a metaphorical figure,'the Jew, as the
to."(91) For Jabes, the homeland of the Jew is the book; it is,
possible, which is why Derrida writes that, for Jabes, "the Jew ...
Here Derrida asserts that, for Jabes, the desert of language is
Edmond Jabes, "Interview," in Criticism in Society, Ed.
Edmond Jabes, "There is Such a Thing as Jewish Writing..," in The Sin of the Book: Edmond Jabes, Ed.
Edmond Jabes, The Book of Questions, Vol 1, Rosemary Waldrop (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1976), 55.
The next afternoon, Claude brings Edmond Jabes. A slight body.
I follow Edmond Jabes through the streets of Paris, through the sentences of The Book of Questions.
Jabes cannot tell a simple story any more than he can imagine a simple God.
More importantly, however, this ecart also explains Jabes's relative silence in the 1930s (the earliest poems of Je batis ma demeure date from the early 1940s) and his reserved stance with regard to the enthusiastic-even overzealous--subscription by some of his compatriots and immediate contemporaries to aesthetic, philosophical or ideological avant-gardism.
The literary differance between France and Egypt brings me to the notion of a philosophical demeure that constitutes the idea of a singular anachronism, "l'anachronisme singulier du temps dont nous parlons." (25) The shift from physical place (Egypt, France), or the place of heritage or glory (one's place in a literary tradition), towards a temporalized, poeticized notion of place adds a nuanced dimension to Jabes's texts.
Crucially for Jabes, to dwell poetically is to dwell temporally, although the semantic field in English is complicated by the obsolescence of some important senses of the term "dwell" (which continue to be present in the French "demeurer").
Poco mas adelante Jabes anade: "de otra parte, si no se puede condividir todo ?que es lo que queda y quedara para siempre fuera de la condivision?
Jabes, Le livre du partage, Gallimard, Paris, 1987, pp.