Ive


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

(I've been) keeping cool

I've been avoiding becoming overly hot, as in hot weather. A: "How have you been during this brutal heat wave?" B: "Oh, keeping cool, thanks to the air conditioning in the office."
See also: cool, keeping

(I've) got to get moving

I need to leave. Well, I've got to get going. It was lovely to see you, as always. Got to get moving before I miss my train!
See also: get, moving

(I've) got to go

I need to leave. Well, I've got to go. It was lovely to see you, as always. Got to go before I miss my train!
See also: go

(I've) got to go home and get my beauty sleep

humorous I need to leave so I can go to sleep. "Beauty sleep" is sleep that will presumably help one to look refreshed and attractive. Well, I've got to go home and get my beauty sleep. It was lovely to see you, as always.
See also: and, beauty, get, go, home, sleep

(I've) got to hit the road

I need to leave. I've got to hit the road now, before traffic gets even worse. Uh oh, the train comes in five minutes—got to hit the road!
See also: hit, road

(I've) got to run

I need to leave. Well, I've got to run. It was lovely to see you, as always. Got to run before I miss my train!
See also: run

(I've) got to split

I need to leave. Well, I've got to split. It was lovely to see you, as always. Got to split before I miss my train!
See also: split

(I've) got to take off

I need to leave. Well, I've got to take off. It was lovely to see you, as always. Got to take off before I miss my train!
See also: off, take

been keeping myself busy

A response that one gives when asked about their wellbeing or life in general. A: "I haven't seen you in awhile. How have you been?" B: "Ah, been keeping myself busy."
See also: been, busy, keeping, myself

if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times

I've reminded you about something many times. Typically said in annoyance or frustration. if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: don't leave your wet towels on the floor! You need to put out the trash on Tuesday mornings—if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times.
See also: if, thousand, times, told

I've been there

I've also done or experienced whatever is being discussed. A: "I got back to my car a mere three minutes after the meter expired, and I still got a parking ticket!" B: "Ugh, I've been there." Failing a test? Oof, I've been there!
See also: been, there

I've got to fly

slang I have to leave; I must depart. Adam's waiting for me, so I've got to fly. Ooh, the train comes in five minutes, so I gotta fly—see you later!
See also: fly

I've got work to do

I have something that I need to do or work on. Often used to emphasize that one is busy. Sorry, but I've got work to do and am on my way to the library. Can we talk about this later? I've got work to do, so I can't come out tonight.
See also: work

I've had enough of this

I have endured as much of someone or something as I can handle. I've had enough of this—it's time for you to leave! Is she still making snarky remarks about me? Oh, I've had enough of this.
See also: enough, of, this

I've had it (up to here) (with someone or something)

I'm frustrated to the point of exasperation (with someone or something). In this usage, the phrase can be followed with "up to here" as an intensifier. I called a babysitter because I've had it with toddler temper tantrums today. I've had it up to here with the lack of raises at this job. Why do I even bother putting forth effort every day?
See also: someone

I've heard so much about you

Said upon meeting someone that one has been told a lot about beforehand. Oh, Susan! Yes, hi, I've heard so much about you! A: "This is my husband, Rich." B: "Oh, it's so nice to meet you—I've heard so much about you."
See also: hear, much

I've seen better heads on nickel beers

slang Said when one deems someone to be stupid. The "head" is the foam that forms when beer is poured into a glass. It is used here as a pun in reference to one's head, representing their brain or intellect. Oh please, I've seen better heads on nickel beers—you can't believe a word that fool says. I can't believe you're so impressed with her—I've seen better heads on nickel beers, honestly.
See also: beer, better, head, nickel, on, seen

if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times

Fig. an expression that introduces a scolding, usually to a child. Mother: If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times, don't leave your clothes in a pile on the floor! Bill: Sorry. "If I've toldyou once, I've told you a thousand times, keep out of my study!" yelled Bob.
See also: if, thousand, times, told

(I've) been keeping myself busy.

 and (I've been) keeping myself busy.
a standard response to a greeting inquiry asking what one has been doing. Bill: What have you been doing? Bob: I've been keeping myself busy. What about you? Bill: About the same. John: Yo! What have you been up to? Bill: Been keeping myself busy.
See also: been, busy, keeping, myself

I've got to fly.

 and l('ve) gotta fly.; (I've) got to fly.
Fig. Inf. I have to leave right now. Time's up. I've got to fly. I've gotta fly. See you later.
See also: fly

I've got work to do.

 
1. Lit. I'm too busy to stay here any longer. Jane: Time to go. I've got work to do. John: Me too. See you. Bob: I have to leave now. Bill: So soon? Bob: Yes, I've got work to do.
2. Fig. Do not bother me. I'm busy. Bill: Can I ask you a question? Jane: Not right now. I've got work to do. Mary: There are some things we have to get straightened out on this Wilson contract. John: I've got work to do. It will have to wait.
See also: work

I've heard so much about you.

a polite phrase said upon being introduced to someone you have heard about from a friend or the person's relatives. Bill: This is my cousin Kate. Bob: Hello, Kate. I've heard so much about you. Sue: Hello, Bill. I've heard so much about you. Bill: Hello. Glad to meet you.
See also: hear, much

I've seen better heads on nickel beers.

Rur. This person is stupid. Jim's good-looking, but I've seen better heads on nickel beers. My students this term aren't what you'd call bright. I've seen better heads on nickel beers.
See also: beer, better, head, nickel, on, seen
References in periodicals archive ?
Ives tries with all his might to feel compassion for Daniel Gomez, the man who has killed his son, to move beyond his grief and anger and find some forgiveness for an act that has broken his heart.
In spite of all his best efforts and devout prayers, Ives found that "the very mention of Gomez had the effect of spilling a poisonous gas into the room....
Miraculously, forgiveness does finally come to Ives, arriving as a grace long sought but no longer expected, a grace irrigating the stony soil of Ives' heart with a nearly forgotten sweetness.
What Ives ultimately discovers is that as much as we try to forgive, such mercy always comes to us from God.
Delacroix, like Ives, is a man deeply wronged, who cannot imagine forgiving the monster who murdered his child but who nonetheless finds it increasingly difficult to live in the confinement of such wrath.
But, as we, see from Ives and Delacroix, the inability to forgive does in time become its own kind of hell, and, whatever the justification, a life stripped of compassion is really a sort of walking death.