it's the economy, stupid


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It's the economy, stupid.

cliché The one thing voters care most about is the health of the country's economy. The phrase was coined by political strategist James Carville for Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992. For all the scandals and controversies surrounding the governor, the thing most likely to unseat her in the upcoming election will be the lingering effects of the recession. After all, it's the economy, stupid.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

it's the economy, stupid

Failing to address economic problems. The phrase was invented by Bill Clinton’s strategist, James Carville, during Clinton’s 1992 campaign for the presidency. Carville suggested Clinton was a better choice for president than George H. W. Bush because Bush had failed to do anything about a recent recession. It hung as a sign on Clinton’s campaign headquarters in Little Rock, Arkansas. The New York Times writer and Nobel Prize–winning economist Paul Krugman used it: “What political scientists . . . tell us is that it really is the economy, stupid” (July 18, 2010). The term not only was repeated enough to become a cliché but gave rise to similar locutions for blame, such as “it’s the voters, stupid” or “it’s the oil spill, stupid.”
See also: stupid
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The mantra "it's the economy, stupid" results in the short-termism of our governments, with their eye always on the next election rather than the long-term good of the country.
So while President Clinton got it right in 1992 with his quip, "It's the economy, stupid," when discussing his country's most important issue, the same applies to Bahrain.
Bush used the rallying cry of, "It's the economy, stupid." Although meant as a focus for the campaign staff, the public became aware of the phrase and has paraphrased it hundreds of times for all sorts of causes.
Yes, to paraphrase Bill Clinton's presidential campaign mantra of two decades ago, "it's the economy, stupid." A closer relationship with the EU is meaningless if Ukraine does not have the economic viability to engage with the West.
"It's the economy, stupid" was the famous slogan of then US presidential candidate Clinton's campaign of 1991 when he unseated President George H.W.
A celebrated, if unofficial, motto of Bill Clinton's first presidential campaign was, "It's the economy, stupid." With the Communist Party Congress meeting on Thursday just a day away, the Chinese population seems to be concerned about the same thing, as the country prepares for a once-in-a-decade transition to a new president and prime minister appointed by the ruling party.
Because it should reflect the demographics of "your market or constituency" (like President Bill Clinton once said: "It's the Economy, Stupid!).
James Carville famously advised presidential hopeful Bill Clinton on the campaign trail, "It's the economy, stupid."
He is being haunted down however by the phrase, which Bill Clinton's manager James Carville famously coined a "It's the economy, stupid".
You might also argue that the regulation debate misses the real issues facing small businesses (it's the economy, stupid).
According to Ann, it's the economy, stupid. It's strange that Mitt must discern the concerns of women with the aid of his female interpreter wife, as though we're an alien species, but so be it.
* "It's the economy, stupid." With a plurality and near-majority in the forthcoming parliament, the Muslim Brotherhood begins to turn its attention to bread-and-butter issues.
"IT'S the economy, stupid." Such preoccupation is understandable, but gives the impression that production and consumption are ends in themselves.
However, the Governor of Arkansas Bill Clinton, from the second poorest state in the country, came to lead a campaign with the slogan of "It's the economy, stupid".
"It's the economy, stupid." The mantra of Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign rang just as true during last fall's midterm elections, when voters upset over the weak recovery installed a new Republican majority in the House of Representatives.