it'll all come out in the wash

it'll all come out in the wash

1. No permanent or lasting effects will occur as a result; things will normalize over time. I wouldn't worry too much about processing the invoice incorrectly; I'm sure it'll all come out in the wash. A: "Do you think Mark hates me after what I said at the party?" B: "Nah, it'll all come out in the wash." Don't worry about paying me back for dinner. It'll all come out in the wash eventually.
2. A lie or other secret will be uncovered eventually. Whatever the mayor is trying to cover up, it'll all come out in the wash.
See also: all, come, out, wash

It'll all come out in the wash.

Fig. It does not matter.; No lasting damage has been done. Tom: I feel so bad about what I said to Bill. I don't think he'll ever forgive me. Mary: Oh, don't worry. It'll all come out in the wash. Jane: I'll never forgive myself for losing Mary's book. Charlie: Just tell her you're sorry, and offer to pay for the book. It'll all come out in the wash.
See also: all, come, out, wash

come out in the wash, it will

A problem will be solved or difficulties will disappear. For example, Don't worry about the fight you got into-it'll all come out in the wash. Cervantes had this metaphoric use of laundry for cleaning up a mess or difficulty in Don Quixote ( Todo saldrá en la colada) and it has been repeated ever since. [Early 1600s]
See also: come, out, will

it will all come out in the wash

Everything will be settled satisfactorily. This term, which alludes to the removal of dirt and stains by laundering, originated in Britain in the late nineteenth century, although a version of it occurred in Cervantes’s Don Quixote (1605): Todo saldrá en la colada (“All will come out in the laundry”). “It all goes into the laundry, but it never comes out in the wash,” wrote Rudyard Kipling (Stellenbosh, 1881).
See also: all, come, out, wash, will