blazing inferno

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blazing inferno

Some place or thing totally engulfed in flame. After the summer-long drought, it didn't take long for a minor forest fire to become a blazing inferno.
See also: blaze
References in periodicals archive ?
Destruction of records through man-made infernos is a serious crime which should not go unpunished.
Director Ron Howard on the similarities between Tom Hanks and his Inferno character Robert Langdon
Competitors will have to eat a large portion of Crocodile Inferno, rice and naan against the clock, with the winner being the rst to polish o The dish.
Dan may be one of the best-selling authors of all time - published in 52 languages with 200 million copies - but that hasn't stopped some critics savaging Inferno.
One of the great values of Inferno is how well it covers the preceding years of war.
SETTING THE STAGE ALIGHT The cast of Disco Inferno entertained the crowds with a dazzling performance of the hit musical
The company said its Inferno product uses Embedded Linux, an open source environment that provides a richer selection of features, applications and tools for developing next-generation printers, MFPs and scanners with improved performance.
The two major advances in the Zebron-1HT and -5HT Inferno columns are in the polyimide coating and the liquid stationary phase.
INFERNO is a lovely gathering of photos by Michael P.
Finding the key may lead to finding him, so Jake and Helen are caught up in an adventure that will lead them into their own kind of inferno and to the cities of Italy.
VALENCIA - The inferno burned down the house to the tune of a cool half-million Saturday night.
LADY Luck returns to Wales -- although footie fans may argue the contrary -- and with her Cirkus Inferno, which set the country ablaze last year.
Chapter 1 entitled "Divine Dialectic: Incarnational Failure and Parody," divided into two sections, makes the case that Dante's incarnational dialectic is "manque" in the Vita Nuova, but successful in its parody in the Inferno.
These dramatic pictures show how a rock band carried on playing even as a huge inferno took hold behind them.
He names the obvious--Dante's Inferno and Linden Hills (with connections as well to the Gothic novel, influences of Edgar Allan Poe, and the picaresque and epistolary novel), and Shakespeare's The Tempest and Mama Day--and the less obvious--Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Bailey's Cafe.